community

Michael Darda and Hali Dardar agree that when the land of southern Louisiana begins to erode into the Gulf, the Houma people will have to move, but that doesn't mean they have to let go of their culture.
StoryCorps

StoryCorps collects the voices of our time. Recently, Hali and Michael Dardar interviewed each other, but don’t be fooled by their common name — they’re not related. Before coming to StoryCorps, they’d only exchanged emails and phone calls about the Houma Language Project, an oral history project for the Houma Native American community.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Raising kids is hard work. The St. Tammany Parish Parenting Center in Covington helps parents from all backgrounds face those challenges and take pride in the role they play in their children’s lives, and it’s also a place to socialize and find camaraderie.

On a recent weekday evening toys were scattered across the carpet and children played while parents filed in after work to support each other and learn how to be the best parents they can be.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

Friends of Lafitte Corridor seeks to revitalize the Lafitte Corridor by working to build, program and promote the Lafitte Greenway as a great public space.

“I brought my family along with me: my husband, my granddaughters. We come to have a good time,” says Ariska Everette, who’s sitting on a folding chair in front of a giant movie screen on the Lafitte Greenway. There’s a tub of popcorn in her lap. She’s waiting for the film Annie to start, but she says just being outside, in this space, feels great.

Donna Jean Loy, left, and Elizabeth Anne Jenkins, right, participate in several activist groups, including Louisiana Trans Advocates and Equality Louisiana.
StoryCorps

At StoryCorps booths around the country, couples pair into an intimate space to share personal stories with each other.

Donna Jean Loy and Elizabeth Anne Jenkins are a transgender couple from Metairie who transitioned later in life after grappling with gender dysphoria for years.

StoryCorps

Inside soundproof booths across the country, friends and loved ones are interviewing each other about their lives. The booths belong to StoryCorps, a project that collects the stories of everyday people in order to create an oral history of America.

Bring New Orleans Back Commission / Urban Land Institute

The first comprehensive map for rebuilding New Orleans came out in early 2006, about six months after the flood. Saying it was highly anticipated would be an understatement. On it, some symbols that appeared as a death knell for some neighborhoods: green dots.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Churches of several denominations are coming together to address an often invisible problem on the Northshore: family homelessness.

Nineteen churches decided to pool their resources and host homeless families in need. They take turns hosting the families at each church and rotate every week, providing food, childcare, counseling services and transportation, to help the family get back on their feet.

Well, technically it’s 13 for now, there’s a baby on the way.

VIA LINK

VIA LINK provides information, referrals, training and crisis intervention to people, organizations and communities so they can help themselves and others.

The VIA LINK call center is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to listen, answer questions and provide resources to people who call 211 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. If a caller is in crisis, the confidential counselor who answers will start helping them on the spot.

National Weather Service

Incredible by Modern Standards— June 1

New Orleans is a weather town. As hurricane season begins, hear the most emotional federal weather bulletin ever written. Plus, more on how the National Weather Service is using social science to improve forecasts. And hear from New Orleans residents who say the argument to call our 2005 disaster “The Federal Flood” instead of just “Katrina” still holds water. Why that weather wording matters.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Rowan Shafer is a third grade teacher at Morris Jeff Community School. She's committed to teaching a social justice curriculum... which she knows can sound abstract.

"Yeah, those are easy words to say that mean a lot of things," she says.

In this month's Voices of Educators segment, Shafer describes one of her favorite social justice units and explains why, after years of teaching fourth grade, she switched to third.

Do you know a great teacher to include in our series? Send us an email: comments@wwno.org

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