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When it comes to child well-being in the U.S., Louisiana ranks near the bottom: 48th. That's according to a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The results of the annual report are, sadly, not shocking. "We have historically always ranked at least in the bottom five states in overall child well-being, so unfortunately that wasn't a big surprise," says Teresa Falgoust. She's with Agenda for Children, which contributed local data to the national report. It looks at trends in data between 2008 and 2014.

Erin Krall / WWNO

New Orleans police are cutting back on night hours at district stations. Officials are also setting up community outreach meetings for feedback on department operations.

"The bomb," a sepecialty po-boy at Guy's Po-Boys in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Guy’s Po-boys was closed for months earlier this year after a vehicle plowed through its front door late one night. Guy’s is back open now, but a group of fellow po-boy purveyors decided to hold a fundraiser to support its proprietor after losing out on so much business during the repairs. It will be a street party with a purpose, powered by po-boys.

See details below:

Host Poppy Tooker with NPR's Kitchen Sisters Davia Nelson, left, and Nikki Silva, right.
Joe Shriner

On this week's show, we take a journey in sound with two radio luminaries, Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva, also known as The Kitchen Sisters.

Davia and Nikki visit our kitchen at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum to discuss their amazing trajectory on NPR as well as how they came to uncover Hidden Kitchens, their duPont-Columbia Award-winning series.

15-year-old Jewel Williams, in Sunny Summer's third period English class at Sci High.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Over the last forty years, as incarceration has surged across the nation, so has the number of children with a family member in prison. According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the number of young people with a father in prison rose 500 percent between 1980 and 2000.


Mission outreach coordinator Daniel Watts hands out snacks for homeless still living under the Pontchartrain Expressway recently cleared to make way for more downtown parking.
Eileen Fleming / WWNO

  

As New Orleans makes way for more downtown parking, police and health workers conducted another sweep under the Pontchartrain Expressway in March of homeless people living in makeshift encampments of tents and bedding.  Eileen Fleming has this report on where they went, how they’re adapting and what the city is planning.

Eat Local Challenge

In the weeks ahead, you may start seeing a different side of local food, one that might include the innovative, the overlooked or underutilized, and even the invasive.

Jesse Hardman / Listening Post

A few months ago a housing notice went up on the local Craigslist page with the provocative headline: "3 bedroom, 900 square feet, God Damn, Someone Get Me Out Of New Orleans."  The author went on to write: "Once the city was built for people like me, times change, now it's built for you." 

This sentiment, that New Orleans is no longer affordable to longtime residents, has been getting louder lately.

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards at the rally at the Capitol on Youth Justice Day.
Sarah Hunt / Louisiana Center for Children's Rights

At all levels of government right now, laws about juveniles are rapidly changing. However, some states, including Louisiana, continue to prosecute and sentence juveniles for sentences of life without parole.

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