coastal restoration

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A New Orleans organization is trying to help fund coastal restoration by quantifying Louisiana wetlands, using hard numbers as a way to offset global carbon emissions.

Companies that send lots of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere — such as power plants and oil refineries — need to offset some of that pollution. So they invest in green carbon projects by spending money on things like protecting forests. One Louisiana company wants to expand that tactic to the Gulf Coast.

Eve Troeh

Louisiana faces the highest relative rates of sea level rise in the world. As policy and funding debates rage over how to best restore and protect our coastal communities, local leaders also look for allies elsewhere.

What to do with all the billions in Clean Water Act fines to be paid by BP and its contractors for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill?

Officially, it’s up to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council, made up of governors from the five affected states and heads of several federal agencies, to decide.

A coalition of environmental groups has come up with their own ideas for how the first millions can best be spent to restore the coast.


Coastal experts met on Louisiana’s Avery Island yesterday to discuss the potential of private investment money to help restore and sustain the Gulf Coast. 

The meeting included representatives of federal and state agencies, universities, investment banking institutions, and non-profits.

The focus was a new report from America's WETLAND Foundation.

That organization is advocating the creation of an ecological marketplace for private investors looking to finance environmental projects.

Serge Ottaviani / Wikimedia Commons

Coastal experts met on Louisiana’s Avery Island to discuss the potential of private investment money to help restore and sustain the Gulf Coast. 

Louisiana’s Moon Shot is the latest coastal feature by Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Bob Marshall, of The Lens. The interactive article, a collaboration with ProPublica, focuses on details of the state’s coastal Master Plan.

glynn424 / pixabay.com

The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, the state agency charged with implementing and maintaining Louisiana’s Coastal Master Plan, is applying for funding for five major restoration projects. The projects include creation of marshes adjacent to the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans East, Lake Maurepas and Biloxi, and money for consolidated management of the Mississippi River.

A coalition of national environmental groups says the billions of dollars expected from the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill penalties should go toward rapidly rebuilding Louisiana’s coastline.

During a teleconference Tuesday, the conservation groups outlined 19 priority projects detailed in their two new reports. David Muth, Gulf Program director for the National Wildlife Federation, says these projects are critical.

Louisiana coastal restoration officials are suing a federal agency over the cost of fixing damage blamed on a now-closed south Louisiana waterway.

The federal court lawsuit was filed Tuesday in New Orleans by the Coastal Restoration and Protection Authority. It notes that the man-made Mississippi River Gulf Outlet is widely blamed for contributing to flooding during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. It says federal law ordering the closure of the channel also requires the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to restore wetlands damaged by years of poor maintenance of the waterway.

Lane Lefort / U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack was in Norco, Louisiana on Monday to announce a new environmental initiative aimed at private landowners along the Gulf Coast.

The Department of Agriculture and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation are looking to fund conservation projects as part of the ongoing recovery from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

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