coastal restoration

Weenta Girmay

State officials want landowners to convert old farmland to wetlands. The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting applications for its Agricultural Conservation Easement Program.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

A new state study says land loss could cost Louisiana a lot of money if nothing is done. The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority commissioned the study, which was done by LSU and the RAND Corporation.

Jesse Hardman

Congress will vote Friday on the federal spending bill and that could mean more money for Louisiana. It includes more than $10 million for the Louisiana Coastal Area Program (LCA.) The program is a partnership between the Army Corps of Engineers and the state.

A marsh restoration project at work.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

There is a federal law that says when wetlands are destroyed by development or industry, they must be replaced somewhere nearby. It is a provision of the Clean Water Act in place since 1980, but it’s getting new attention because of increased industrial development in Louisiana.

Ryan Hagerty, National Digital Library of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service

When John Bel Edwards starts his new job as governor in January he will face lots of big decisions on how to spend BP settlement money and bring in more capital to restore the eroding coast.

mississippiriverdelta.org

The state announced on Wednesday that it will divert water from the Mississippi River to rebuild eroding wetlands in Plaquemines Parish.

The Mid-Barataria and Mid-Breton diversions are the first two projects of this scale.

Creating Land at the Edge of Louisiana

Aug 31, 2015

  In Bayou Grand Liard, down by the toe of Louisiana’s boot, the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority is creating marsh. Chuck Perrodin, a spokesman for CPRA, sums up what’s going on: “We’re taking what used to be land and marsh, went back into open water, and now we have made it back into land.”

Examining the Gulf Coast's master plan

Aug 21, 2015
Lizzie O'Leary

When you talk to some residents along the Louisiana coast about rebuilding after Katrina, they'll say it almost doesn't matter if you rebuild the area unless its protected from another storm — and like many things, that hinges on money.

St. Bernard Parish from the air.
Jesse Hardman

A coalition of wetlands restoration advocates are using the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina to push their cause, rebuilding marsh along the Mississippi Delta. The MRGO Must Go Coalition wants to remind local residents that Hurricane Katrina’s impact was largely due to environmental degradation caused by private and public entities.

In a lush green bayou a little southeast of New Orleans, John Lopez and Howard Callahan are cruising the waterways in an airboat under the hot Louisiana sun on a recent day.

It's an area known as Breton Basin, and Callahan is a local land manager who often helps researchers such as Lopez explore environmental changes in coastal wetlands. The pair head to a concrete and steel structure that separates the bayou from the nearby Mississippi River.

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