coastal restoration

Make Wetlands Great Again
Ryan Kailath / WWNO

Louisiana spends heavily on building wetlands and levees to protect its eroding coast. Over the next three years, the state plans to put nearly $300 million into land-building alone. But as the true picture of sea level rise comes into view, officials may need to explore a less popular option: retreat from the coast.


Verdin family

Every five years, the state revamps its master plan to restore coastal Louisiana. This year, they’re hosting community meetings in coastal areas to tell people about master plan updates for 2017.

The Coastal Restoration and Protection Authority’s master plan is in the process of being updated, which happens every five years. The new plan includes “non structural” projects – like elevation, flood proofing, and even relocating people. In order to get local input, CPRA officials are hosting a series of community conversations along the coast.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

With oil prices down, Louisiana has lost about 12,000 jobs in oil and gas since last year. Some of those oil and gas workers are finding new jobs in coastal restoration. That includes helping rebuild a chain of barrier islands to protect the coast. One of those state-funded projects is in Plaquemines Parish.

A slate of bills before the Louisiana state legislature, if passed, will redirect funding from coastal restoration efforts. WWNO's Tegan Wendland spoke with Bob Marshall, environmental reporter for The Lens, about the proposed legislation.

 

 


Albert Poche stands on a "floating mat" of vegetation in the Four-Mile Marsh outside of Ponchatoula. The City of Hammond is discharging 3-4 million gallons per day of partially-treated sewage into the marsh.
Ryan Kailath / WWNO

 

St. Bernard Parish is considering a new marsh creation project: adding partially-treated sewage to Bayou Bienvenue, east of New Orleans. The idea is to build up vegetation—and spur marsh creation—by tapping the natural fertilizer that humans around the world create daily.

 


Lane Lefort / U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The president’s federal budget proposal includes a plan to give away money set aside to restore the Gulf Coast to other states.

Weenta Girmay

State officials want landowners to convert old farmland to wetlands. The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting applications for its Agricultural Conservation Easement Program.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

A new state study says land loss could cost Louisiana a lot of money if nothing is done. The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority commissioned the study, which was done by LSU and the RAND Corporation.

Jesse Hardman

Congress will vote Friday on the federal spending bill and that could mean more money for Louisiana. It includes more than $10 million for the Louisiana Coastal Area Program (LCA.) The program is a partnership between the Army Corps of Engineers and the state.

Pages