coastal land loss

New Orleans: Ready Or Not? The Storms Will Come

Jul 12, 2018
Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Improvements to the federal hurricane protection system mean New Orleans is better prepared for storms than ever before. But just outside the levees, coastal land loss continues to be a threat. To address it experts say officials need to come to terms with what it means to be a coastal city.

 

Listening Coast

This week on the Coastal New Roundup: how the state of Louisiana sometimes benefits from coastal erosion. Plus, an update on the fight over sediment diversions in Plaquemines Parish.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Sinkholes. Potholes. The streets of New Orleans are full of them. No matter how you get around — by bus, car, bike — you've probably seen (and felt) your fair share of them. 

WWNO's Coastal Desk is hosting a sinkhole and pothole tour in Mid-City on May 12, in collaboration with The Lens and iSeeChange, and we'd love for you to join us. 

Anjali Fernandes

This week on the roundup: a new study out of Tulane finds the Mississippi River can’t keep up with coastal land loss, an oil spill shuts down the river, and Hurricane names are retired.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux and Nola.com/The Times Picayune’s Sara Sneath talk about the week in coastal news.

Elizabeth Chamberlain / Vanderbilt University

According to new research, the Mississippi River delta will be much smaller in the future — even as the state plans to spend billions trying to rebuild it.

 

The researchers, led by Elizabeth Chamberlain — who is now at Vanderbilt after getting a PhD from Tulane — looked at how the Mississippi River used to build land thousands of years ago, which can illustrate how it might build land in the future. They took samples of sediment up and down Bayou Lafourche — which was the main river channel at the time.

Della Hasselle / The Lens

Coastal scientists are almost finished rebuilding a barrier island that has been washing away for years. It’s one of several island projects in the state’s Coastal Master Plan. They’re big projects that state officials have planned for a long time, but only recently got money for.

Coastal News Roundup: Nola.com/The Times-Picayune Teams With New York Times On Coastal Reporting

Feb 23, 2018
Listening Coast

This week on the Roundup we hear from the whole team at Nola.com/The Times-Picayune about a big project they just completed that goes to print Saturday. Coastal reporters Mark Schleifstein, Sara Sneath and Tristan Baurick collaborated with The New York Times on a series about the vulnerability of South Louisiana.

Coastal News Roundup: The Latest On The Tiny Bug Eating The Marsh

Sep 15, 2017
Travis Lux / WWNO

An invasive insect plaguing the coast has killed thousands of acres of tall marsh grass that bind our fragile wetlands together. Coastal researchers worry that the threat could increase the rate of coastal erosion and destroy fish habitat. Fishermen are worried.

Lauren Sullivan / Flicker/CC BY-SA 2.0

A new study shows Louisiana’s land loss has slowed down a little bit. But that’s still not necessarily good news.

 

It’s almost become a tired refrain here in Louisiana -- the state loses an average of about a football field of land every hour. Now it takes about 100 minutes, roughly an hour and a half for that much land to wash into the Gulf of Mexico.

Matt Hauer / Nature Climate Change

Rising seas and sinking land are forcing many along Louisiana’s coast to make hard decisions. Stay put, or move inland to safety. But it’s not just a problem here, coastal residents across the nation are facing the same challenges.

A study recently published in the journal Nature Climate Change predicts that millions will move inland in coming years.

WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with Matt Hauer, a demographer at the University of Georgia, about how this will change life in coastal areas - and create new challenges for the communities where those people will move. 

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