coastal erosion

Jesse Hardman

Every week WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response.

A month ago we ran a segment about coastal erosion. And you, our loyal Listening Posters, were kind enough to share questions you had on the topic.

Today we have some answers for you.

Eve Troeh

Louisiana Highway 1, or just LA-1, is the longest continuous road in the state, running from the northeast corner down to Grand Isle. One particular stretch of it poses a particular challenge: as coastal erosion and sea level rise continue at rapid rates in southern Louisiana, LA-1 is more consistently flooded. This leaves residents and anyone who needs to travel the road inconvenienced at best, and in peril at worst.

Lane Lefort / U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Commuting statistics indicate that coastal parishes are losing residents because of coastal erosion, according to a new report released Sunday by the New Orleans-based Data Center. And it says those left behind are on average older, poorer or otherwise vulnerable.

Jesse Hardman

Every week WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week's topic is coastal erosion.

Louisiana has 40 percent of the nation’s wetlands. A combination of man-made and environmental factors are causing more than 25 square miles of that area to disappear annually.

Leeville Arts and Heritage Festival

Leeville, Louisiana is at the southern tip of Bayou Lafourche, along Louisiana state Highway 1. Recent decades have seen the town all but wash away, due to coastal erosion.

This Saturday, March 29, marks the first ever Leeville Arts and Heritage Festival. Janet Rhodus is the executive director of Launch Leeville, a nonprofit founded to promote the town. The Baton Rouge resident described her first trip to Leeville.


Attorneys for the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority — East had a chance to defend their lawsuit against oil and gas companies, at a meeting of the state Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority on Wednesday in Baton Rouge.

The head of the state coastal authority, Garret Graves, has been one of the harshest critics of the lawsuit since it was filed last July. Governor Bobby Jindal has also been critical of the suit.


An international design competition is offering $400,000 for ideas about how to improve Louisiana's waterways.  The "Changing Course" design contest is reviewing proposals from around the world to rebuild the sinking basins south of New Orleans, while at the same time maintaining enough water for navigation and commerce.

Lens Reporter Bob Marshall says that the state can learn a lot from other areas that are facing the same challenges.

The U.S. lost an average of 80,000 acres of coastal wetlands from 2004 to 2009, according to the latest data published by federal agencies. More than 70 percent of the estimated loss came in the Gulf of Mexico; nationwide, most of the loss was blamed on development that incurred on freshwater wetlands.

"The losses of these vital wetlands were 25 percent greater than during the previous six years," NPR's Elizabeth Shogren reports for our Newscast unit. She also notes that the loss equals "about seven football fields every hour."

Losing Louisiana

Nov 4, 2013

This special multimedia feature — from The Weather Channel and New Orleans-based reporter Katy Reckdahl and photographer Kathleen Flynn — examines how and why the Louisiana coast is disappearing into the Gulf of Mexico, largely through the eyes of the people living there.

Army Corps of Engineers digital library

Many states suffer from a shortage of water, but not Louisiana — we’ve got a surplus. Problem is, we don’t know what to do with it. And as our coastline diminishes each year, the urgency to make a decision is pivotal.

Experts have been brainstorming about Louisiana’s relationship with water, and they recently congregated at the second annual Anba Dlo symposium to share their thoughts with the public.