Coastal Desk

Environment
12:41 pm
Sat June 7, 2014

Restoring The Coast By Creating Oyster Beds In St. Bernard Parish

Concrete oyster beds wait to be offloaded into St. Bernard's Lake Athanasio
Credit Jesse Hardman / WWNO

A consortium of environmental and industry stakeholders are making concrete reefs on the Gulf Coast in an attempt to create new oyster habitats. The Lake Athanasio project covers a half a mile of St. Bernard Parish coastline, and seeks to satisfy coastal restoration and commercial interests by giving oysters a sustainable habitat to mature.

Tyler Ortego developed the engineering concept behind the artificial reefs.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Fri June 6, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: James Stram

James Stram.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Thu June 5, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: George Barisich

George Barisich.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Wed June 4, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: Greg Miller

Greg Miller.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Tue June 3, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: John Taylor

John Taylor.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp.” Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
9:00 am
Mon June 2, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?

Destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned the Bayou Bienvenue freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, leaving mostly just open water.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Mon June 2, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: Amanda Moore

Amanda Moore.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Environment
3:52 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Tropical Storms Hitting Peak Strength Nearer Poles, Study Says

A NOAA image taken by the Japan Meteorological Agency in September shows Typhoon Usagi. A new study says that such tropical cyclones are reaching peak intensity farther away from the equator.
NOAA/JMA AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 4:29 pm

Tropical storms are migrating out of the tropics, reaching their peak intensity in higher latitudes, where larger populations are concentrated, a new NOAA-led study published in the journal Nature says.

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Green Minute
3:45 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

The Green Minute: Myths Of Recycling, Part Four

Credit Shirley Hirst / Pixabay

This is it, we’re closing out our recycling journey, and it all ends with glass.

New Orleans still does not recycle glass. I know! It’s sad, but don’t include it in your bin. It creates safety issues for recycling facility workers who hand-sort our single stream system.

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Green Minute
11:57 am
Fri May 2, 2014

The Myths Of Recycling, Part Three: Don't Shred Paper!

Don't tear the paper! Leave as is, and recycled it will be.
Credit PublicDomainPictures / Pixabay

We’re back with more myths of curbside recycling. Shredded and crumpled paper create a lot of confusion for sorting machines — hard to believe, but true. Sorting mechanisms can’t distinguish crumpled paper from plastic, and ultimately, it just winds up in the trash.

The same goes for shredded paper. The small bits drop through the equipment like water through a colander, and then it drops into the trash piles heading to the landfills. So…?

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