classical music

Continuum presents excerpts from the medieval Play of Robin and Marion (Jeu de Robin et Marion). It is the earliest secular play with music, written in around 1282 to 1283, and is the most famous work of Adam de la Halle (1220-1288).

This Continuum program presents early music performed on four different instruments from the medieval and Renaissance periods. They are two string instruments and two wind instruments; the viola da gamba, the Renaissance lute, the organetto (a small portative lap organ) and the recorder.

Continuum this week presents a program called The Cries of London, referring to the short lyrical and musical calls of merchants hawking their products and services at the beginning of the 17th century. Many street cries were incorporated into larger musical works, preserving them from oblivion.

This week on Inside the Arts, the Gambit 2016 Tribute to the Classical Arts honors the best in classical music, opera and dance at its annual luncheon benefiting the Foundation for Entertainment, Development and Education.

We talk with classical pianist Dr. Wilfred Delphin, alumnus and artist-in-residence in the Department of Music at Xavier University. Delphin is receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award.

This week on Continnum Milton Scheuermann and Thais St. Julien present examples of the first forms of polyphony, music composed for two or more melodies performed at the same time.

A program of music of some of the most famous German minnesingers is presented on this Continuum. The minnesingers are the German counterpart of the medieval French troubadours and trouveres.

Continuum this week will present a special New Year's program of early music, both sacred and secular. The sacred music is primarily from the Manuscrit du Puy, which brings together a varied group of Aquitanian monodic and polyphonic chants for the New Year from the 12th to the 16th centuries.

This week on Continuum you'll hear excerpts from the Feast of Fools, a post-European Christmas event dating from the Middle Ages. Occurring between Christmas and Epiphany, this celebration was marked by much license and buffoonery. The clergy and the laity traded places for a day and interesting things happened, particularly in The Mass of the Ass.

You'll hear it from these CDs: The Feast of Fools (The New London Consort) L’Oiseaus-Lyre 433 194-2, and La Fete de L'Ane (Clemencic Consort) Harmonia Mundi HMT 7901036.

On this Continuum you'll hear a special program of early Christmas music performed by the New Orleans Musica da Camera. This is music from their CD, Natus Est, directed by Continuum hosts Milton Scheuermann and Thais St. Julien.

This week, Continuum presents a program of medieval Christmas music, most of which is unknown to modern day listeners. Beginning with Aquitanian selections of the 12th century, the program progresses through the Italian, Spanish and German repertoire, ending with a selection of 15th century English carols.

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