city park

New Orleans City Park

Editor's Note: In celebration of the city’s upcoming Tricentennial, NolaVie and New Orleans Historical bring you the series Who Did it Better: New Orleans Then and Now. In it, we look at offbeat aspects of the city’s history and their parallels in the present. Today we go to City Park, in a segment we call A Walk in the Park.

Travis Lux / WWNO

More than 100 volunteers fanned out across City Park over the weekend for something called BioBlitz. It was an effort to document all the plants and critters that call the park home, and meant to help the park plan for the future.

 

Sean Augustine may be eight years old, but he knows how to prepare for a day in the woods. He’s got a big hat, multi-pocketed cargo pants, and boots. He’s also got a raincoat on hand because he doesn’t want anything to get in the way of the day’s mission.

New Orleans City Park / cityparkgolf.com

City parks are good for water runoff. Open green areas soak up rain and trees wick it down into the water table. So in a wet city like New Orleans, City Park is an important asset.

 

WWNO’s Tegan Wendland sat down with CEO Bob Becker to learn about how water management was considered in the park’s new golf course. The park is independent - it doesn’t get money from the city - and Becker says they needed the $26 million course to cover a quarter of the park’s budget.

NolaVie

Sometimes, just sometimes, communities can actually get together to do something that transcends politics.

The greater New Orleans area will soon see such an event. Through a collaboration of the City of Kenner, New Orleans City Park and the folks at the Helis Foundation, the public good is going to be served in the most artistic of ways: with the installation of a very special, long-missing bronze sculpture. Created for the 1984 World's Fair in New Orleans, The Wave is getting a new home in City Park.

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

“Green” used to be just a color. Now it’s a way of life. Everything from household trash to billion-dollar industrial plants can be “green” — meaning we undertake an activity mindful of the impact we’re having on our environment.

We use the word “green” because it’s the most ubiquitous color in nature. In cities we’ve coined a term for urban nature — Green Space.

Equest Farm: Country Mouse In The City

May 15, 2013
Maureen McMurray / WWNO

In his State of the City Address last week, Mayor Mitch Landrieu praised the New Orleans Recreation Development Commission for the growth of this year’s summer youth programs, which include 33 youth camps, seven teen camps and an expanded summer jobs program. For parents and guardians seeking something a bit more rural, it’s also possible — and right within New Orleans city limits.

Located in the northernmost reaches of City Park, Equest Farm is straight out of a Laura Ingalls Wilder novel. 

New Orleans City Park announced it will be closed through Wednesday in anticipation of the arrival of Tropical Storm Isaac.

The shuttered attractions include Storyland, the Botanical Gardens, boat and bike rentals, the Parkview Café, the golf course and tennis center, and the NOLA City Bark dog park.

More than 100,000 trees — including many beautiful live oaks and magnolias — were lost when Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in 2005.

In response, Hike For KaTREEna — a nonprofit group dedicated to reforesting the Crescent City — was created.

Since 2006, more than 10,000 volunteers have helped to plant 13,400 trees — including oaks, cypress, red maples, crepe myrtles, magnolias, redbuds, Savannah hollies and citrus trees such as navel orange, satsuma, lemon, lime and grapefruit.

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Seven years ago, when the waters rose in New Orleans on August the 29th, they swamped a way of life in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Among the thousands of casualties in that city was a masterpiece, the New Orleans Botanical Garden.

On this week's episode you'll find out how the Navy plans to commemorate the War of 1812; how City Park has generated a lot of revenue since Hurricane Katrina; and how you can see the winner of the 2012 Masters tournament in New Orleans.