circle food store

The story of New Orleans' recovery in one business

Aug 11, 2015
David Brancaccio and Katie Long

It’s been 10 years since Hurricane Katrina and the flood-of-floods struck New Orleans. In the following decade, the city has transformed its public schools, housing and business community.

Infrogmation / Flickr

The owner of the reopened Circle Food Store in New Orleans has cut what he hopes is last strip of red tape blocking his business.

Infrogmation / Flickr

Dwayne Boudreaux cut the grand opening ribbon on his re-opened Circle Food Store in the 7th Ward last January. But he’s still cutting red tape to get his store to its full potential.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

More than eight years after it flooded and closed due to Hurricane Katrina, the Circle Food Store on the corner of Claiborne and St. Bernard Avenues is about to reopen its doors. The historic landmark served the 7th Ward from 1938 up until the storm, and it’s said to have been the first New Orleans grocery owned and operated by African-Americans. Long time residents and customers voice their reactions to the long-awaited return of this neighborhood staple.

A landmark New Orleans food store that hasn't re-opened since Hurricane Katrina hit nearly seven years ago is getting financial help as it works to make a comeback.

New Orleans officials announced Thursday that the Circle Food Store will receive a $1 million loan from the city's Fresh Food Retailer Initiative, a program started last year to expand access to healthy, affordable food in low-income areas.

The initiative is funded through federal grant money and by the nonprofit Hope Enterprise Corporation.