Business & Technology

Out To Lunch
12:50 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Bust Out The Beads

Rick Delaup, Peter Ricchiuti and Anne Rolfes.
Grant Morris It's New Orleans

In Out to Lunch’s first Annual Commander's 25-cent martini (x7) Mardi Gras business lunch, Peter Ricchiutti abandons all hope of a serious Mardi Gras conversation and goes for dancers and beads with Bustout Burlesque creator Rick Delaup and Zombeads founder Anne Rolfes.

Out To Lunch
1:00 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Another Great Idea for an App

Simon Marthinsen, Peter Ricchuiti and Neel Sus.
Grant Morris It's New Orleans

With literally a billion apps available, how's your idea going to do?

New Orleans app builder Neel Sus from Touch Studios hears a lot of ideas for phone and tablet apps — is there one more great one out there? Simon Marthinsen's start-up Plebu is taking on the other great 21st century every-man tech challenge — build yourself a better website.

All on this week's Out to Lunch, with Peter Ricchiuti.

Business
3:39 pm
Sat February 2, 2013

Voodoo Music Festival Sold to SFX Entertainment

The Voodoo Music Experience has been bought by SFX Entertainment, a New York-based producer and promoter of concerts and other live entertainment, according to an article on Billboard Magazine's website.

Though SFX — a subsidiary of Clear Channel Communications — has recently been acquiring dance music properties, Robert F.X. Sillerman, the company's president, told Billboard the mutli-genre Voodoo festival is a great fit for them.

Read more
Out To Lunch
1:00 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

From Boots to Pedicabs

Sal Palmisano of NOLA Pedicabs and Peter Ricchiuti.
Grant Morris It's New Orleans

New Orleans' once most-hated-man gets on his bike!

Sal Palmisano was New Orleans' Enemy Number One when he came up with the brilliant business plan to boot drivers’ questionably-parked cars.

Today he is the pioneer of a whole new set of wheels: NOLA Pedicabs.

Planet Money
2:35 am
Thu January 24, 2013

Why Is The Government In The Flood Insurance Business?

Hurricane Betsy hit the Gulf Coast in 1965.
Horace Cort AP

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 12:19 pm

There's a quick, one-word explanation for why the federal government started selling flood insurance: Betsy.

Hurricane Betsy, which struck the Gulf Coast in 1965, became known as billion-dollar Betsy. Homes were ruined. Water up to the roofs. People paddling around streets in boats. Massive damage.

This would be the time when you'd expect people to be pulling out their flood insurance policies. But flood insurance was hard to come by. You could get fire insurance, theft insurance, car insurance, life insurance. Not flood.

Read more
Out To Lunch
1:00 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

Taxi!

Jack Culotta, United Cabs Lead Attorney; Nawlins Cab's Sheree Kerner and host Peter Ricchuiti.
Grant Morris It's New Orleans

New Orleans city government is unleashing a world of new regulations on taxicabs, and it’s got United Cabs upset enough to drag the city into court.

Planet Money
12:55 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Planet Money: Black Market Pharmacies And The Spam Empire Behind Them

Krebs on Security

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 9:33 am

  • Listen to the Episode

Chances are you've received an email with a subject line like this "The hottest method to please your beloved one" or this "Want to get good health for low prices?" Emails offering "low cost med pills!"

You've probably wondered — who is sending these emails? Does anyone actually click on these links? What happens when they do?

Read more
Out To Lunch
1:00 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Bill of Health

Peter Ragusa, Peter Ricchuiti and Joe Lovett.
Grant Morris It's New Orleans

On this edition of Out to Lunch Peter introduces us to New Orleans' and Louisiana's little-known but potentially significant contribution to the future of healthcare.

Peter Ragusa unveils Better Day, software that aims to replace every medical record in America; and Joe Lovett heads up The Louisiana Fund, an impressive fund of Louisiana venture capital investors.

Planet Money
7:33 pm
Sun January 13, 2013

Planet Money: The Price Of Things We Love

Shapeways, Hannelore Foerster/ Getty Images, NPR

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 10:11 pm

  • Listen to the Episode

On today's show: Three short stories about the stuff we buy — books, toys and clothes.

1. Are E-Books Actually Destroying Traditional Publishing? Conventional wisdom says e-books are destroying the traditional publishing business model. People pay less for e-books and that drives down price. When you talk to publishers though, you realize the story's not that simple.

Read more
Digital Life
2:28 am
Thu January 10, 2013

In Video-Streaming Rat Race, Fast Is Never Fast Enough

Tommy Ingberg iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 12:55 pm

On average, YouTube streams 4 billion hours of video per month. That's a lot of video, but it's only a fraction of the larger online-streaming ecosystem. For video-streaming services, making sure clips always load properly is extremely challenging, and a new study reveals that it's important to video providers, too.

Maybe this has happened to you: You're showing a friend some hilarious video that you found online. And right before you get to the punch line, a little loading dial pops up in the middle of the screen.

Read more

Pages