business

PODCAST: A paint store ten years after Katrina

Aug 21, 2015
David Brancaccio

Airing Friday August 21, 2015: On today's show we check in on the global stock market, firefighters in the Western states, and a small paint store in New Orleans ten years after Katrina.  

Businesses revive one street in New Orleans

Aug 20, 2015
Caitlin Esch

Elysian Fields Avenue in New Orleans connects the Mississippi River to Lake Pontchartrain. It crosses from high ground to low, passing through wealthy neighborhoods and low-income communities. Some sections flooded after Hurricane Katrina, others didn't.

You can pretty much tell the story of the city's post-Katrina recovery just by dropping in on businesses along that street. So that's what we did. We zoomed in on one section of Elysian Fields — an industrial stretch that took many years to come back. And we talked to the business owners responsible for the rebirth.

There is a wealth of advice you would likely give yourself, if you could visit with the past you.

In turn, there are things that the present you could address that would help you in the future.  Certified Financial Planner Byron Moore take a light-hearted look at some of the conversation the three could share, if they could ever cross paths.

  Everybody knows right from wrong. Everybody knows numbers don’t lie. And nobody wants to spend time in prison. Why, then, would a person lie about corporate profits knowing there’s a high probability they’re going to get caught and end up behind bars?

Peter's guest on Out to Lunch wrote the book on business ethics, and it’s not theoretical.

Baskets of perfectly seasoned deep-fried chicken sizzle during lunch hour at Dooky Chase Restaurant in New Orleans, a city famous for its food. But the real magic happens early in the morning, when Leah Chase, 92, arrives to prepare the day's specials.

"I made meatloaf today. Smothered pork chops. I did oyster and artichoke soup," says Chase.

Dooky Chase is a landmark in the city's historically African-American Treme neighborhood.

Charting New Orleans' charter school experiment

Aug 13, 2015
David Brancaccio and Katie Long

It's been 10-years since Hurricane Katrina and the flood-of-floods struck New Orleans. In the following decade, the city has transformed it public schools, housing, and business community. Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio traveled to the city to explore what these vast changes mean for New Orleans and the country. 

Lillie Cotlon, left, encouraged her son, Burnell, to quit his job at Family Dollar and start his own business in their neighborhood.
StoryCorps

New Orleanians encountered one obstacle after another as they rebuilt their city after Katrina. Urban food access became a problem for many neighborhoods, especially those with low income.

Lower 9th Ward resident Burnell Cotlan saw this problem troubling his community, so he built The Lower 9th Ward Market. His mother, Lillie, helped him along the way. 

The story of New Orleans' recovery in one business

Aug 11, 2015
David Brancaccio and Katie Long

It’s been 10 years since Hurricane Katrina and the flood-of-floods struck New Orleans. In the following decade, the city has transformed its public schools, housing and business community.

How independent businesses kept New Orleans afloat

Aug 10, 2015
David Brancaccio and Katie Long

Panera and Starbucks are fine, but Laurel Street Bakery is something different. Hillary Guttman, the proprietor, recalls no chain coffee places opening near her in the weeks that followed the flood. First responders were a hungry market themselves.

Stephen Watson, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of the National World War II Museum.
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

In New Orleans we often take pains to point out what makes us different from other places. It’s pretty common to hear comments like, “We’re not like the rest of the country,” and “We’re not like the rest of the South.”

So it’s ironic that two of New Orleans’ newest icons are representative of the South, and the rest of the country. And they’re just a few blocks away from each other: The National World War II Museum and The Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

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