business

It was known as the "Swankiest Night Spot in the South" and considered one of the most famous clubs in the network of black cabarets known as the "Chitlin' Circuit." During the era of segregation, it was the cultural mecca of black New Orleans — what the Savoy Ballroom was to Harlem. Little Richard, a frequent performer there, even composed a song about the place.

Jesse Hardman

This coming week in New Orleans will be packed with press conferences and commemorations as the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina’s nears. The Lower 9th Ward, considered one of the city's most devastated neighborhoods a decade ago, is seeing more visitors than usual, including city workers and business investors.

Leah Chase’s 65 years in the same New Orleans kitchen

Aug 21, 2015
Lizzie O'Leary and Jenny Ament

Since 1946, Leah Chase has been in the kitchen Dooky Chase's Restaurant in New Orleans. She’s served Quincy Jones, Jesse Jackson, Duke Ellington, Thurgood Marshall, James Baldwin, Ray Charles, former Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, and many others.

Quite simply, she's a legend in the city. Her restaurant was flooded with 5 1/2 feet of water from Katrina and closed for two years. Now 92, she speaks with Lizzie O’Leary from her kitchen, where she still shouts out orders to her staff every day.

Ten years ago, when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, it was the city's Lower Ninth Ward that was hit the hardest.

"I remember coming back home," Lower Ninth resident Burnell Cotlon told his mother, Lillie, on a recent visit with StoryCorps. "That was the first time I cried."

"We lost everything," Lillie says.

Examining the Gulf Coast's master plan

Aug 21, 2015
Lizzie O'Leary

When you talk to some residents along the Louisiana coast about rebuilding after Katrina, they'll say it almost doesn't matter if you rebuild the area unless its protected from another storm — and like many things, that hinges on money.

How Katrina changed the face of New Orleans

Aug 21, 2015
Lizzie O'Leary and Raghu Manavalan

In the 10 years since Katrina, New Orleans and the Gulf Coast have been reshaped in many ways: who lives there, the kind of work they do and what they can afford. Being Marketplace, we wanted to "do the numbers" on New Orleans.

Allison Plyer is executive director of the Data Center, a New Orleans-based think tank that publishes the New Orleans Index, a data-based looked at the demographics of New Orleans.

Total city population: Down

PODCAST: A paint store ten years after Katrina

Aug 21, 2015
David Brancaccio

Airing Friday August 21, 2015: On today's show we check in on the global stock market, firefighters in the Western states, and a small paint store in New Orleans ten years after Katrina.  

Businesses revive one street in New Orleans

Aug 20, 2015
Caitlin Esch

Elysian Fields Avenue in New Orleans connects the Mississippi River to Lake Pontchartrain. It crosses from high ground to low, passing through wealthy neighborhoods and low-income communities. Some sections flooded after Hurricane Katrina, others didn't.

You can pretty much tell the story of the city's post-Katrina recovery just by dropping in on businesses along that street. So that's what we did. We zoomed in on one section of Elysian Fields — an industrial stretch that took many years to come back. And we talked to the business owners responsible for the rebirth.

There is a wealth of advice you would likely give yourself, if you could visit with the past you.

In turn, there are things that the present you could address that would help you in the future.  Certified Financial Planner Byron Moore take a light-hearted look at some of the conversation the three could share, if they could ever cross paths.

  Everybody knows right from wrong. Everybody knows numbers don’t lie. And nobody wants to spend time in prison. Why, then, would a person lie about corporate profits knowing there’s a high probability they’re going to get caught and end up behind bars?

Peter's guest on Out to Lunch wrote the book on business ethics, and it’s not theoretical.

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