business

Robert Warren

In the past ten years, New Orleans has become known nationwide for education reform through charter schools. It's also earned a reputation as a hub for entrepreneurship. Those two worlds are coming together.

The port plans to add rubber-tire gantry cranes like these to add to their container marshalling yard in an effort to increase container handling and turn times.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Business is good for the Port of New Orleans. Cargo shipping is up about 20 percent this year from last. Because the Port is an independent public entity, not run by the city or state, it can take that extra money and invest it right back into operations. There are currently more than $40 million worth of improvements underway as a result.

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

There’s an old saying about how to be successful in business - “Build a better mousetrap.” Meaning find a product everybody wants and do it better.

Peter's guests on Out to Lunch today have come up with new variations of products that enjoy massive worldwide popularity. Soft drinks and coffee.

Dionne Grayson / It's New Orleans

For the past few years, with all the Hollywood folks in town, it’s not unusual for someone at Whole Foods in New Orleans to whisper, “Do you know who that is?” It’s usually a celebrity who looks quite different in the cereal aisle from how she looks on the screen.

Today on Out to Lunch Peter's playing a business version of "Do you know who that is?"

Dionne Grayson / It's New Orleans

There are two types of people in the world. The type that think 3D printing is the new industrial revolution. And the type that says, “What the heck is 3D printing?”

There’s a local 3D printing company called Entrescan that’s hoping to convert the Type B folks to Type A with a phone app called Scandy.

Out To Lunch: Oil And Gusts
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

Everybody likes to think they’re important, but here in Louisiana we really are. Two sectors of our local economy are major components of the national, and global, economy: oil and gas, and renewable energy.

Outside of the oil companies who physically drill for oil, there is a huge industry of companies who do everything else – from building oil rigs to delivering groceries to the men and women who work on them. One of the biggest offshore support companies in the world is headquartered here in New Orleans. Tidewater.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

In business, and other organizations, we hear about "mission drift." That's a condition where the organization loses track of what it set out to accomplish. The way to re-focus is to get back to basics.

That’s what we're doing today on Out to Lunch. We’re talking about three very basic elements - sunshine, water and dirt. And we’re looking at how we can harness these three elements to re-focus us on one of our missions as a city that we seem to have drifted away from –- resurrecting the 9th Ward.

Tulane University

A proposal to build a new coal export terminal in Plaquemines Parish has drawn criticism from environmental groups and the public, who say it presents a public health threat. It has been so contentious that the state Department of Natural Resources has faced lawsuits and is currently reviewing its approval of the project after taking input from the public.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

The financial markets go up and down. The value of real estate goes up and down. The dollar strengthens and weakens. Financial advisors have a wide range of theories of risk versus diversification that they say can either make you a fortune, or hedge your bets. Through all this noise, there are investor voices who continue to say just two words. “Buy gold.” Is that good advice? Or is that just as risky as anything else?

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  According to the reputable Henry J Kaiser Family Foundation, right around twenty percent of the population of the United States is under 15. That’s a sizeable market. You don’t have to look very far to see the marketers of stuff that kids like trying to sell it to them. Mostly food and toys. Which demonstrates that we don’t change all that much as we grow older.

But there are other businesses aimed at kids that aren’t exploitative, and can be a part of a child’s development. Peter Ricchiuti's guests on today’s show are in those kinds of businesses.

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