business

Out To Lunch: Primo Premium
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

If you drive a car, at some point in the next few days you’re probably going to need gas. If you fill up at the pump at a convenience store, your experience will never be the same after you listen to this edition of Out to Lunch.

Classroom training equipment in the Oil & Gas Production Technology Department at Bossier Parish Community College. The BPCC program has seen its enrollment down by more than 40% in the current oil downturn.
Ryan Kailath

 


Derrick Hadley was born to work in the oil field — almost literally. His father named him after an oil rig, spelling and all.

Out To Lunch: Sun, Water And Dirt
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

In business, and other organizations, we hear about "mission drift." That's a condition where the organization loses track of what it set out to accomplish.

The way to re-focus is to get back to basics. That’s what we're doing today on Out to Lunch. We’re talking about three very basic elements: sunshine, water and dirt. And we’re looking at how we can harness these three elements to re-focus us on one of our missions as a city that we seem to have drifted away from — resurrecting the 9th Ward.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Even as the price of oil drops, and offshore drilling slows down, huge amounts of crude oil keep flowing into Louisiana’s oil ports. The biggest is LOOP, the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port. It’s a major pass-through point for a lot of U.S. crude. But instead of heading out to refineries, oil is being stockpiled at LOOP.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The oil and gas downturn has resulted in a loss of about 12,000 jobs across Louisiana over the past year. Many of those jobs are concentrated in smaller metropolitan areas, like the Cajun city of Lafayette, which has lost the most. The city that once boomed as a result of oil and gas activity is now struggling to not go bust.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

A sudden drop in oil prices last year has brought huge challenges to the state of Louisiana — more than 10,000 layoffs in the oil and gas sector and a $400 million hit to the state budget. Long known for its “working coast” — represented by shipping, fishing and industry in south Louisiana and along the Mississippi River — the downturn brings with it something of an identity crisis.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

If you’ve ever had folks come visit you in New Orleans from out of town, they’ve probably said, “If I lived here I’d put on a hundred pounds.”

This Out to Lunch is all about how to kick ass, and what to do after your ass gets kicked.

Photo courtesy of Cafe Reconcile.

Cafe Reconcile brings innovative life skills and job training to young people from severely at-risk communities.

 

 

 

“So the word of the day today is open-mindedness. What does it mean to have an open mind, and is it important to have an open mind?” asks Rachel Crump, a social worker at Cafe Reconcile.

Phyllis Jordan and Wes Palmisano.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  This edition of Out to Lunch is a fascinating view of New Orleans business that looks at the past, present and future of the city and surrounding economies with unusual insight. Host Peter Ricchiuti is joined by Phyllis Jordan and Wes Palmisano.

Each year on most mornings of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, the Sync Up conference brings together leaders in music, film and digital media for educational and networking events to help independent artists navigate the changing landscape of new media.

WWNO's Paul Maassen spoke with Scot Aiges, ‎Director of Programs, Marketing & Communications at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation, about this free gathering, now in it's 9th year.

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