business

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  We've all seen this guy or woman on TV, and we’ve all said, "Thank God that’s not me." The person sweating behind a bank of microphones, trying to explain away something bad. What if one day, maybe through no fault of your own, that person is you? Having to explain why things aren’t quite how they look. How do you know what to do? What to say?

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  Most businesses grow successful over time as their owners find more efficient ways to make and market specific products. It would seem counter intuitive to open a business based on products that change constantly. And products you can't even imagine, that have to be re-invented up to three and four times a year, based on the season.

That's exactly what the fashion business is. Peter's guests on tis edition of Out to Lunch today have opened fashion houses in New Orleans that make and sell handmade clothes and accessories.

CenturyLink is cutting around 55 jobs from its Louisiana workforce as part of a companywide layoff plan.

Spokesperson Annemarie Sartor did not indicate what positions were part of the reduction.  The telecommunications company employs about 2,500 people at its headquarters in Ouachita Parish.

Earlier this month, CenturyLink announced a reduction of 1,000 jobs companywide.  They employ approximately 44,000 workers around the world.

The layoffs come following disappointing second quarter earnings that were reported in late July.

A New Orleans Business Banks On New Connections

Aug 28, 2015
Noel King and Caitlin Esch

At McMillan's First Steps preschool, there's a big mural painted on the cafeteria wall. A smiling boy is held in the air by a doctor, a pastor and a police officer.

Plus, a guy in a Home Depot uniform.

In another city that might seem weird, but not in a city that is rebuilding. Linda McMillan, who owns First Steps, says the flooding that followed Hurricane Katrina destroyed her campus.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  In New Orleans when we talk about "going to the airport" we automatically assume we’re talking about Louis Armstrong Airport in Kenner. But there's another airport. In Orleans Parish.

Lakefront Airport is over 80 years old. Not all those years have been great for business. For some of them the airport was boarded up. Today, Lakefront might finally be lining up for take off.

Financial Comparisons

Aug 26, 2015

No two financial situations are the same.  Certified Financial Planner Byron Moore says be careful to make financial comparisons with others.


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It was known as the "Swankiest Night Spot in the South" and considered one of the most famous clubs in the network of black cabarets known as the "Chitlin' Circuit." During the era of segregation, it was the cultural mecca of black New Orleans — what the Savoy Ballroom was to Harlem. Little Richard, a frequent performer there, even composed a song about the place.

Jesse Hardman

This coming week in New Orleans will be packed with press conferences and commemorations as the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina’s nears. The Lower 9th Ward, considered one of the city's most devastated neighborhoods a decade ago, is seeing more visitors than usual, including city workers and business investors.

Leah Chase’s 65 years in the same New Orleans kitchen

Aug 21, 2015
Lizzie O'Leary and Jenny Ament

Since 1946, Leah Chase has been in the kitchen Dooky Chase's Restaurant in New Orleans. She’s served Quincy Jones, Jesse Jackson, Duke Ellington, Thurgood Marshall, James Baldwin, Ray Charles, former Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, and many others.

Quite simply, she's a legend in the city. Her restaurant was flooded with 5 1/2 feet of water from Katrina and closed for two years. Now 92, she speaks with Lizzie O’Leary from her kitchen, where she still shouts out orders to her staff every day.

Ten years ago, when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, it was the city's Lower Ninth Ward that was hit the hardest.

"I remember coming back home," Lower Ninth resident Burnell Cotlon told his mother, Lillie, on a recent visit with StoryCorps. "That was the first time I cried."

"We lost everything," Lillie says.

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