business

Dionne Grayson / It's New Orleans

There are two types of people in the world. The type that think 3D printing is the new industrial revolution. And the type that says, “What the heck is 3D printing?”

There’s a local 3D printing company called Entrescan that’s hoping to convert the Type B folks to Type A with a phone app called Scandy.

Out To Lunch: Oil And Gusts
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

Everybody likes to think they’re important, but here in Louisiana we really are. Two sectors of our local economy are major components of the national, and global, economy: oil and gas, and renewable energy.

Outside of the oil companies who physically drill for oil, there is a huge industry of companies who do everything else – from building oil rigs to delivering groceries to the men and women who work on them. One of the biggest offshore support companies in the world is headquartered here in New Orleans. Tidewater.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

In business, and other organizations, we hear about "mission drift." That's a condition where the organization loses track of what it set out to accomplish. The way to re-focus is to get back to basics.

That’s what we're doing today on Out to Lunch. We’re talking about three very basic elements - sunshine, water and dirt. And we’re looking at how we can harness these three elements to re-focus us on one of our missions as a city that we seem to have drifted away from –- resurrecting the 9th Ward.

Tulane University

A proposal to build a new coal export terminal in Plaquemines Parish has drawn criticism from environmental groups and the public, who say it presents a public health threat. It has been so contentious that the state Department of Natural Resources has faced lawsuits and is currently reviewing its approval of the project after taking input from the public.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

The financial markets go up and down. The value of real estate goes up and down. The dollar strengthens and weakens. Financial advisors have a wide range of theories of risk versus diversification that they say can either make you a fortune, or hedge your bets. Through all this noise, there are investor voices who continue to say just two words. “Buy gold.” Is that good advice? Or is that just as risky as anything else?

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  According to the reputable Henry J Kaiser Family Foundation, right around twenty percent of the population of the United States is under 15. That’s a sizeable market. You don’t have to look very far to see the marketers of stuff that kids like trying to sell it to them. Mostly food and toys. Which demonstrates that we don’t change all that much as we grow older.

But there are other businesses aimed at kids that aren’t exploitative, and can be a part of a child’s development. Peter Ricchiuti's guests on today’s show are in those kinds of businesses.

fema.gov

The Environmental Protection Agency released new standards on Tuesday for emissions from petroleum refineries.

The EPA says the standards will cut down on CO2 emissions and prevent about 1.4 million people from being exposed to pollutants in the air, like benzene. Regularly breathing such pollutants can cause respiratory problems, increased risk of cancer and other health problems.

Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority / http://cims.coastal.louisiana.gov/FLOODRISK/

Entrepreneurs and businesspeople met at the New Orleans business incubator Propeller on Thursday night to learn about how they can help restore the coast.

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

  In 1814 it was the British who were "runnin' down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico." Today, ships of almost every nationality are steaming down the river to the Gulf. 54 of them belong to International Shipholding. Their fleet of cargo vessels ply international trade from their current headquarters in Mobile, Alabama but they're set to return soon to their original home in New Orleans.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

The world of New Orleans education is changing. For elementary, middle, and high schools that change has been so radical that we’ve become global pioneers in charter education.

There’s another education transformation going on that you might be less familiar with. It’s a parallel universe. Of paradoxes. They’re educational entrepreneurial ventures -- that are nonprofit. Organizations that integrate into the education system -- but aren’t a part of it. Two of these intriguing new ventures are here in New Orleans.

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