business

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

Wherever you go in the world you find human beings have two things in common. We all like to eat. And we all like to incorporate into our living spaces non functional objects we call art.

In many countries we’ve institutionalized these traits. We dine in restaurants and we hang art in galleries. In New Orleans, as usual, we’ve gone our own way. We’ve turned dining into an art form. And our artists are increasingly hanging their works in their own spaces.

Peter's guests on Out to Lunch today represent both strands of this movement.

Governor-elect John Bel Edwards.
Richard David Ramsey

Louisiana Governor-elect John Bel Edwards announced earlier this month an executive order he’ll issue once in office, that will protect LGBT state and government employees from being fired based on sexual orientation. An executive order issued by current Governor Bobby Jindal, which protects the right to not recognize gay marriage, was largely seen as a negative for business.

McIlhenny Company Archives, Avery Island, La

You know how you can walk into a mainstream clothing or household store, like Urban Outfitters, H&M, Pier One, and find indigenous designs printed across anything from a rug to a tank top? Well this is the hyperlocal origin story of how native aesthetics entered into non-native markets.

A new national report has some suggestions for Louisiana lawmakers struggling to balance the state budget. The Pew Charitable Trusts found that sharing information is key to predicting revenue flow.

Eve Abrams

NewCorp has served as convener of the Mardi Gras Indian nations including the Yellow Pocahontas, Mohawk Hunters, Washitaw Nation, Apache Nation, Naypayshni Cherokee Warriors, Fiyiyi, Indians of the Nation, Hard Head Hunters and Golden Camanche. These groups have formed the Black Mardi Gras Indian Cooperative.

A marsh restoration project at work.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

There is a federal law that says when wetlands are destroyed by development or industry, they must be replaced somewhere nearby. It is a provision of the Clean Water Act in place since 1980, but it’s getting new attention because of increased industrial development in Louisiana.

Out To Lunch: Giving
Dionne Grayson / It's New Orleans

In 2005, many of us in New Orleans found ourselves in a position we could never have imagined. Homeless. Our place of work closed down. Our insurance companies refusing to compensate us. And our government largely useless.

Until then it was just a cliché. But the kindness of strangers saved our lives. And our city. It is no exaggeration to say that in those dire days New Orleans was resurrected by good people and charitable organizations.

Robert Warren

In the past ten years, New Orleans has become known nationwide for education reform through charter schools. It's also earned a reputation as a hub for entrepreneurship. Those two worlds are coming together.

The port plans to add rubber-tire gantry cranes like these to add to their container marshalling yard in an effort to increase container handling and turn times.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Business is good for the Port of New Orleans. Cargo shipping is up about 20 percent this year from last. Because the Port is an independent public entity, not run by the city or state, it can take that extra money and invest it right back into operations. There are currently more than $40 million worth of improvements underway as a result.

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

There’s an old saying about how to be successful in business - “Build a better mousetrap.” Meaning find a product everybody wants and do it better.

Peter's guests on Out to Lunch today have come up with new variations of products that enjoy massive worldwide popularity. Soft drinks and coffee.

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