built environment

Community
5:57 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Richard Campanella Cityscapes: How New Orleans Got Greek

The first permanent structure of the Holy Trinity Eastern Orthodox Church was built 1866.
Courtesy Richard Campanella

This month's Cityscapes column in NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune from geographer and author Richard Campanella details the geography of the Greek community in New Orleans. Most city residents would probably first think of Greek Fest, the annual festival held on the grounds of Holy Trinity Eastern Orthodox Church overlooking Bayou St. John. The congregation marks its 150th anniversary this year.

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Features
1:19 am
Fri March 14, 2014

Cityscapes: Richard Campanella On The Geography Of Cool

A map of the cool, and the uncool.
Richard Campanella

We continue our monthly conversation with Richard Campanella on his monthly Cityscapes column in the Times-Picayune and NOLA.com.

WWNO News Director Eve Troeh spoke with Campanella about his latest work, mapping the "cool" factor across downtown New Orleans. It all started with his research on Bourbon Street, a once-cool place that is now, Campanella finds, decidedly uncool.

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Arts & Culture
8:02 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Shotgun Geography: Richard Campanella's Cityscapes

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Tulane School of Architecture professor and author Richard Campanella explains a new aspect of New Orleans geography and culture in his monthly Cityscapes column for NOLA.com. This month: Shotgun geography, an examination of the shotgun house.

WWNO News Director Eve Troeh sat down with Campanella to learn more.

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Features
8:57 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Richard Campanella Cityscapes: How New Orleans House Numbers Came To Be

MItchell 1864 Map of New Orleans
wikimedia commons

Today we start a new series with New Orleans geographer Richard Campanella. The Tulane professor and author of Bienville’s Dilemma and Geographies of New Orleans, among other titles, also recently started a column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune. His “Cityscapes” pieces explore New Orleans’ urban landscape and history each month.

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