bonnet carré spillway

After opening up the Bonnet Carre Spillway upriver of New Orleans on Sunday the Army Corps of Engineers has decided it won’t need to open the Morganza Spillway. The Corps issued a statement Monday, saying that based on current forecasts it won’t be necessary in order to relieve the swollen Mississippi River.

The Army Corps of Engineers used small cranes to slowly begin opening up the Bonnet Carre Spillway.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The Army Corps of Engineers opened the Bonnet Carré Spillway Sunday morning in order to relieve the swollen Mississippi River and prevent flooding in New Orleans.

Colonel Rick Hansen, commander of the Army Corps of Engineers New Orleans District,  says it’s time to open the Bonnet Carre Spillway in order to divert floodwaters and protect New Orleans.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

As the Mississippi and Red Rivers rise, officials are grappling with how to manage all of the water. The Army Corps of Engineers may open the Mississippi River’s Bonnet Carré Spillway this weekend.

New Orleans District Commander, Col. Rick Hansen, says it is time to open the spillway. Just west of the city, it diverts the Mississippi River to protect New Orleans.

Mississippi River flood stage predictions over the most recent, and next several, days.
National Weather Service

The National Weather Service has issued a flood warning for the Mississippi River in New Orleans and surrounding areas, effective January 12. This comes as floodwater from devastating winter rain in the Midwest makes its way south.

The river is expected to reach flood stage, 17 feet, in the next week. Rain is also in the forecast starting Wednesday night, adding to the risk of flooding. NWS warns not to drive cars through flooded areas.

Tobin Fricke

Governor Bobby Jindal has issued a state of emergency as the Mississippi River rises due to floodwater making its way south after heavy rain the Midwest.

University of New Orleans researchers are getting federal money to study shrimp and crab populations over the 120 miles of coast between Lake Borgne in Louisiana to Mobile Bay in Alabama.

On Thursday, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management announced funding the $1.2 million five-year study of blue crabs, brown shrimp and white shrimp.

Researchers will track the abundance and distribution of the shellfish with the aim of understanding fluctuations in their populations and to see how they recover from disasters.

Eileen Fleming

About 1,000 new Cypress saplings are taking root in the Bonnet Carré spillway. The project coordinated by America’s Wetland Foundation is taking advantage of the Mississippi River silt diverted during last spring’s high water levels.