Eileen Fleming / WWNO

As Sunday’s four-year anniversary of the BP oil spill approaches, environmental groups headed out into one of the areas most heavily oiled in the disaster. There, they looked at what effects that oil could be having on wetlands, and inspected the latest damage from coastal erosion, ongoing before and after the spill.

It takes about a half-hour on John Stubbs’ 22-foot fishing boat to get from the Myrtle Grove Marina in Plaquemines Parish to Bay Jimmy in Barataria Bay.

Michael Seymour / LDWF

A mated pair of Whooping Cranes has produced eggs in the Louisiana wild for the first time in 70 years, the state Department of Wildlife and Fisheries announced Tuesday.

The announcement, made by LDWF Secretary Robert Barham at the 13th North American Crane Workshop in Lafayette, is a watershed moment in the reintroduction of the endangered birds to the wild. Once widespread, the Whooping Crane population had plummeted to just 21 total birds by the 1940s, mostly due to hunting and the conversion of wetland habitat into agricultural fields.

International Paper has donated its Lake Erling property in South Arkansas' Lafayette County to the Shreveport-based AGRED Foundation. It stands for American Gamebird Research Education and Development. Eric Fletcher, AGRED Foundation director, said this donation – 7,600 acres in all – will ensure that Lake Erling is maintained to the high standards set by International Paper for the past 57 years.

Audubon Nature Institute

The Audubon Aquarium of the Americas has announced the hatching of three more African Blackfooted penguin chicks — bringing to eleven the number of the endangered birds hatched at the Aquarium in one year.

The end of summer means back to school, back to the grindstone, back from vacation. And for millions of birds, it means time to fly south for the winter.

One particular type of bird — the purple martin — has spent the summer preparing for that journey under the Causeway bridge. Right where the south shore connects to the Causeway, tens of thousands of the birds have maintained a roost, with a second roost further along the bridge. They sleep under it, flying in right at sunset. The last summer stragglers are now getting ready for their flight south.

Carolyn Scofield / WVUE

The Louisiana Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is making over 100 hens and female chicks available for adoption on Monday. The birds were part of last week's massive seizure of animals from a property in New Orleans East suspected of being a holding, breeding and training area for fighting roosters.

Audubon Nature Institute

Three endangered African Blackfooted penguin chicks are now on display at the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas penguin exhibit, the Aquarium announced today.

The chicks, born in March, are growing quickly, the Aquarium says, and are products of the Audubon Penguin Breeding Program.

Bring Your Own Presents: 'Virginia'

May 13, 2013
Akasha Rabut

This is a story told by a New Orleans resident at a local event called Bring Your Own. It is a live storytelling pop-up series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and other intimate spaces within the community. Each month, seven storytellers have 7 minutes to respond to a theme with live, unscripted, true stories. 

From the state Department of Environmental Quality, Michael Vince who talks about ozone levels and air quality in the Capital area.

A chat with Henry Bradsher, former Associated Press Southeast Asia Bureau Chief, who has retired in Baton Rouge. 

Ornithologist David Sibley, who'll be addressing the Baton Rouge Audubon Society.

Kisatchie National Forest wildlife biologists are preparing to install a webcam above a bald eagle’s nest on Kincaid Lake in Boyce, La. It’s a bit complicated, according to Steve Shively, a wildlife biologist on the Calcasieu Ranger district. It will involve climbing a tree and installing the camera 100 feet above the ground. But he said it’s totally worth it and webcams trained on raptor nests are common around the country.