bars

Ian McNulty

As the Hurricane Katrina anniversary draws closer, you’ll hear a lot about New Orleans restaurants and what their comeback did for the city’s recovery. You’ll hear some of this for me too. It’s an important story, and a powerful one.

But first, I need to acknowledge the role played by a different sort of establishment that came back fast on the heels of Katrina, a type that may not have necessarily served food but did provide social nourishment — served up by the glass, the cup, the bottle or whichever way they could manage it.

Angie Garrett / Flickr

On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we set out to discover hot spots both literally and figuratively in our backyard.

Thomas Walsh

There's no shortage of bars in New Orleans, but if you're looking to get a specialty craft beer the The Avenue Pub should be among the first places you go.

Years ago, Polly Watts inherited the business from her father and turned it around from it's original Miller-Coors-Budweiser base. Now it's one of the South's leading craft beer bars and a  favorite spot for beer enthusiasts. Pull up a stool to have a drink with Polly on this week's Louisiana Eats!

Malorie Marshall / WWNO

Smoking in bars might become a thing of the past in New Orleans. City Councilwoman LaToya Cantrell and other organizations recently brought a smoke-free week to the city. That’s meant to raise support for a ban on smoking in bars.

New Orleans is known as a place where people like to unwind. Go-cups, ice-cold daiquiris, rich food, music and good times.

One aspect of this experience might be about to change.

Krista / Flickr

Partying at French Quarter Fest can be serious work. If you’re looking to take a break there’s few places better than one of the French Quarter’s classic bars — and there’s no shortage of them.

We’ve highlighted a few of our favorites below, along with a couple of brand-new classics to add to the pantheon. Have some favorites of your own? Add them in the comments below and we’ll update the story.

Classic

Lafourche Parish Council is considering whether later bar-closing hours on the weekend would provide an economic boost or a law enforcement problem.

The council will debate and ultimately vote later this month on a measure that would give Lafourche bars the option of staying open until 3 a.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

Bars would still have to close at 2 a.m. Sundays through Fridays — the same time required throughout the week now.

The change would not apply to bars in the incorporated areas of the parish.

Although there's been a neighborhood bar on Banks Street for decades, many New Orleanians might not think of it as the epicenter of St. Patrick's Day without the help of Stephen Paterson