Arts & Culture

Inside the Arts
11:21 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Inside The Arts: S.O.U.L. Encore, Southern Rep Brings Classic Drama To Central City, Paul Taylor 2

Paul Taylor 2 Dance Company
Credit Tom Caravaglia

This week on Inside the Arts, Singers Of United Lands, known as S.O.U.L., are in town for an encore performance. The vocal quartet shares cultural experiences from around the globe through the gift of song.

Then, Southern Rep Theater continues its 2015 season in the newly opened Ashé Power House with Suddenly Last Summer by Tennessee Williams.

And, the world renowned Paul Taylor 2 Dance Company returns to the Marginy Opera House with two programs of modern dance.

Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:45 a.m.

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NOLA Life Stories
5:00 am
Wed March 4, 2015

NOLA Life Stories: Tom Benson's Journey To The Top

Tom Benson, pictured with wife Gayle and granddaughter Rita Benson LeBlanc, grew up in the St. Roch neighborhood and graduated from Brother Martin High School and Loyola University.
Credit Chuck Cook

When Tom Benson purchased the New Orleans Saints in 1985, the team had never had a winning season. Over the course of 30 years, Tom has helped reshape the team to become one of the NFL's most popular teams and a source of community pride throughout the Gulf South. 

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Arts & Culture
5:28 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

New Museum Depicts 'The Life Of A Slave From Cradle To The Tomb'

In recent years, some popular antebellum plantations have started to incorporate displays about slavery. But the Whitney Plantation has designed the visitor's entire experience around that history.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 7:31 pm

The section of Louisiana's serpentine River Road that tracks along the Mississippi between New Orleans and Baton Rouge is known as "Plantation Alley." The restored antebellum mansions along the route draw hundreds of thousands of visitors a year.

The newest attraction aims to give visitors a realistic look at life in the pre-Civil War South. Don't expect hoop skirts and mint juleps, but stark relics that tell the story of a dark period in American history, through the eyes of the enslaved.

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Inside the Arts
2:26 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Inside The Arts: Parading Feet, Ashé Power House, New Zealand's Black Grace

New Zealand's Black Grace Contemporary Dance
Credit Duncan Cole

This week on Inside the Arts, you'll hear how a pilot program is bringing comfort to the aching feet of school marching bands, many of which racked up miles in Carnival parades. 

Then, the Ashé Culture Arts Center is expanding its Central City campus with a multi-million dollar state-of-the art performance center and visual art gallery. We talk with executive director Carole Bebelle about plans for the new Ashé Power House.

And, New Zealand's premier contemporary dance company Black Grace makes its New Orleans debut.

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Arts & Culture
3:40 pm
Thu February 19, 2015

'Above Canal: Rights and Revival' Explores New Orleans' Civil Rights Legacy And Neighborhood Change

Jeanne Nathan of CANO and Keith Duncan in front of one of Duncan's works, "Times-Picayune," on display at the Myrtle Banks building, 1307 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., through Feb. 28
Eve Troeh WWNO

The art show “Above Canal: Rights and Revival” honors New Orleans' Civil Rights Movement legacy with archival photos of local actions, activists and leaders. This history is explored alongside contemporary art that speaks to themes of neighborhood change over time.

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Inside the Arts
1:30 pm
Tue February 17, 2015

Inside The Arts: It's Carnival Time

This week on Inside the Arts, the greatest free show on earth, Mardi Gras 2015 is here. We celebrate with a Carnival revue!

Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:45 a.m.

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Arts & Culture
12:50 pm
Fri February 13, 2015

Everywhere Else It's Just Tuesday: How Do You Explain Mardi Gras?

The 2015 Krewe of Muses.
Credit Jason Saul / WWNO

The final Friday of Mardi Gras is upon us, which means it's time for most New Orleanians to wrap up the final odds and ends at the office, hit the supermarket to stock up, and party their hearts out until Fat Tuesday.

However, some of us have jobs that necessitate interacting with people outside of the Gulf Coast, many of whom, let's face it, just don't understand what in the world is going on down here. For them, Mardi Gras is just another snowy Tuesday.

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Arts & Culture
7:37 am
Fri February 13, 2015

New Orleans Most Talked Of Club: Proudly Westbank, As Other Krewes Relocate To St. Charles Ave.

The Krewe of NOMTOC clubhouse.
Credit Michael Patrick Welch / WWNO

One of the last West Bank krewes, NOMTOC, parades in Algiers this Saturday, February 14. The acronym for this this almost 60-year-old mostly African-American krewe stands for New Orleans Most Talked Of Club.

Michael Patrick Welch spent time with New Orleans Most Talked of Club, for more on their traditions and community.

Few are more excited to ride this Mardi Gras season than the krewe of NOMTOC. NOMTOC, stands for “New Orleans’s Most Talked of Club.” But then you say you’ve never heard of ‘em?

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Arts & Culture
11:07 pm
Wed February 11, 2015

Sounds Of Jefferson Variety At Carnival Time

Amber Tucker and Temple Byars dig into the wall of fringe.
Eve Abrams

Carnival means costuming. And for many people, costuming means a visit to Jefferson Variety: the renowned emporium of fabric, feathers, glitter, trim and tassel.

Eve Abrams brings us this sound portrait of the place where Mardi Gras Indians, seamstresses, costumers and anyone in search of the perfect shade of bling finds the materials to make their Carnival visions come true. And in the spirit of Mardi Gras, a disclaimer: this story contains sensitive parts of female anatomy mentioned by name.

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Arts & Culture
4:18 pm
Wed February 11, 2015

Forget Beads: Cajun Mardi Gras Means A Grand, Drunken Chicken Chase

The annual Courir de Mardi Gras in Mamou, La., in February 2008. In the Cajun country tradition, revelers go house to house, collecting ingredients for gumbo from local families. Here, the host tosses a live chicken from a rooftop for the participants to catch — which can be tricky, considering the festivities often begin with early-morning drinking.
Carol Guzy Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 5:38 pm

Mardi Gras is about ephemera, the thrill of the chase. In New Orleans, that's cajoling a strand of special glass beads or a glittered coconut from the hands of a stranger high up on a parade float. But the moment that trinket is nabbed, the recipient might think: Now what am I going to do with this?

Cajun Mardi Gras, however, in the small towns south and west of New Orleans, raises no such question. Because what you aim to catch is very useful. And edible.

It's a squawking, flapping live chicken.

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