arts & culture

Movies I've Seen A Million Times
11:04 am
Mon July 9, 2012

What Can Whoopi Goldberg Watch A Million Times?

All summer long, fellow NPR program Weekends on All Things Considered is asking directors, actors and producers what movie they could watch over and over again. To Kill A Mockingbird is an all-time favorite for Whoopi Goldberg, the actor, comedian and talk show host.

Africa
10:45 am
Thu July 5, 2012

'African Booker' Defies Image Of Tragic Continent

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 11:01 am

The Caine Prize for African Writing recognizes an African writer each year for a short story written in English. This year's prize went to Nigerian Rotimi Babatunde for "Bombay's Republic." It's about a Nigerian soldier who fought in Burma during World War II. Host Michel Martin talks with Babatunde and CNN's Nima Elbagir, one of the judges.

Books
10:45 am
Thu July 5, 2012

What Happens When The Honeymoon Is Over?

From the flowers, to the dress, to the cake, it's easy for brides to get caught up in planning the wedding. But after the honeymoon, a lot of couples ask, "now what?" Wedding Cake for Breakfast features essays by 23 brides in the year after they say "I do." Host Michel Martin talks with co-editor Wendy Sherman and contributor Andrea King Collier.

Dead Stop
2:52 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Beyond The Music In St. Louis Cemetery No. 2

Ernie K-Doe poses outside his Mother-In-Law Lounge during Jazz Fest in New Orleans in 2001. He died a few months later and was buried in St. Louis Cemetery No. 2.
Pat Jolly AP

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

There's so much water in, around and underneath New Orleans, that the dead spend eternity in tombs above ground.

Most of the tombs now have a similar design: On top, there's space for a wooden coffin or two, and at the bottom lies a potpourri of decanted family remains. Sooner or later, whoever is up high must vacate and settle lower, making room for the newly dead. That's how families stay together — in a desiccated jumble of grandpas, grandmas, siblings and cousins.

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The Reading Life
6:45 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

NOLA Gay History and Bayou Soul Conference

This week on The Reading Life, Frank Perez and Jeffrey Palmquist talk about In Exile: The History and Lore Surrounding New Orleans Gay Culture and Its Oldest Gay Bar, and Clarence Nero tells us what's in store at the Bayou Soul Writers Conference.

American Dreams: Then And Now
4:37 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

Deval Patrick Says The Dream Is In Danger

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 11:03 am

Deval Patrick says he's living the American dream. He's the first black governor of Massachusetts, one of only two ever elected as governor in American history. But he says many Americans feel the dream is under threat. Host Michel Martin speaks with Governor Patrick about his new book, Faith In The Dream.

Arts & Life
11:56 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Last-Minute Wedding Planning Easier Than You Think

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 2:40 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, that 4th of July feast is just around the corner and many of us are hoping to load our plates with meat, but one cook is saying, why not go vegan? Anupy Singla will share her cookbook, "Vegan Indian Cooking: 140 Simple and Healthy Vegan Recipes." That's in just a few minutes.

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Inside the Arts
9:32 am
Thu June 28, 2012

Ralston Crawford and Jazz

The late American artist Ralston Crawford is best known for his Precisionist paintings, abstract representations of urban life and industry post WWI.  But he was also an accomplished photographer, and spent a lot of time in the Crescent City after WWII.

A lesser known body of works on view at the New Orleans Museum of Art is ringing a high note with local music lovers, and we go Inside the Arts for a look at the exhibit — Ralston Crawford and Jazz.

The Sound of Books
8:02 pm
Wed June 27, 2012

New Collection of Essays by Longtime Gourmet Magazine Wine Editor Gerald Asher

Today on The Sound of Books with Fred Kasten — the new collection of essays by longtime Gourmet Magazine wine editor Gerald Asher — A Vineyard in My Glass.

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The Sound of Books
7:46 pm
Wed June 27, 2012

Widely Acclaimed Debut Novel Set in 2008 Financial Crisis

Today on The Sound of Books with Fred Kasten — The Darlings, the widely-acclaimed debut novel by Cristina Alger, set against the 2008 financial crisis.

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