arts & culture

The Reading Life
2:00 pm
Tue July 24, 2012

Author William Joyce and Poet Chris Hannan

This week on The Reading Life: More of Susan's interview with the fabulous Oscar-winner William Joyce about The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore and storyteller Coleen Salley, as well as a reading by poet/lawyer Chris Hannan.

The Mix
11:49 am
Tue July 24, 2012

The Mix: New Orleans, Inside Out

Mardi Gras Indians march through the crowd at the 2007 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. The Mardi Gras Indians are a mainstay of New Orleans culture, marching alongside brass bands in the annual Mardi Gras parades.
Sean Gardner Getty Images

Louisiana music has such a hold on music lovers around the world that nearly every popular artist borrows from it. Or replicates it. Or, some might say, steals from it.

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"Swamp People" Casting
8:51 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

'Swamp People' casting calls: 3 La. cities, 1 in TX

The History Channel TV show "Swamp People" is looking for new alligator hunters. They can be individuals, groups or families, but must have a license and at least 50 tags for the September alligator season in Louisiana.

The show is going into its fourth season, and has featured different hunters each year.

It held casting calls Sunday at restaurants in Baton Rouge and in Beaumont, Texas. Others are scheduled this Saturday in Houma and in Webster, Texas, and on Saturday, Aug. 4, in Lafayette.

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First Listen
5:21 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

First Listen: Christian Scott, 'Christian aTunde Adjuah'

Christian Scott's new record, Christian aTunde Adjuah, comes out July 31.
Kiel Adrian Scott Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 5:05 pm

Audio for this feature is no longer available.

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New Orleans Healing Center
12:27 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Joan Rivers to host New Orleans comedy show

When comedian Joan Rivers thought her New York apartment was haunted about 15 years ago, she called on New Orleans voodoo priestess Sallie Ann Glassman to perform a "spiritual cleansing" of the brownstone.

Glassman says the pair became friends during that meeting, at which Glassman wore a flowing white gown and chased off the disturbing spirits in a night of rituals.

Rivers says Glassman's efforts worked.

Next month, the comedian is heading to New Orleans to return the favor.

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Notes from New Orleans
5:00 am
Thu July 19, 2012

Global Piano Competition Takes Place at Loyola

After an arduous application process a group of piano players from around the world are set to contend against each other at Loyola University's Roussel Hall. Sharon Litwin brings us this story of diligence, passion, and competition on this week's Notes from New Orleans.

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The Sound of Books
7:50 am
Wed July 18, 2012

Widely-Praised New Memoir from California Writer and Grief Therapist Claire Bidwell Smith

Today on The Sound of Books with Fred Kasten: the widely-praised new memoir from California writer and grief therapist Claire Bidwell Smith, The Rules of Inheritance.

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The Reading Life
7:00 pm
Tue July 17, 2012

James Lee Burke

This week on The Reading Life, our entire show is devoted to a conversation with James Lee Burke, whose new novel in the Dave Robicheaux series is Creole Belle.

Books
4:27 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Encyclopedia Brown: The Great Sleuth From My Youth

cover detail

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 10:35 am

Donald Sobol, the creator of the beloved character Encyclopedia Brown, died last week of natural causes, his family says. He was 87. The first in the Encyclopedia Brown series book was published in 1963, and the series has never gone out of print.

Crime novelist and forensic pathologist Jonathan Hayes has this appreciation of the character Sobol gave young readers.

While other boys got hooked on books about sports legends and race car drivers, there was something about Donald Sobol's boy detective Encyclopedia Brown that spoke to me right away.

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Crime In The City
4:04 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Big Crime, Little State: Murder, Mystery In R.I.

Roger Williams, memorialized with a statue in Prospect Terrace Park, founded Providence in 1636. According to crime writer Bruce DeSilva, corruption set in not long after.
Will Hart via Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 9:20 am

Providence, R.I., has a history of mob violence rivaling that of New York or New Jersey, but it comes with a gritty intimacy that could only be found in the nation's littlest state. Author Bruce DeSilva says that's what makes Providence the perfect place to set his crime fiction.

"It is big enough to have the usual array of urban problems," he says. "But it's so small that it's claustrophobic. It's very hard to keep a secret in places like that."

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