arts & culture

The Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities has announced it will honor New Orleans native Cokie Roberts as its Humanist of the Year. Over the past 30 years, the award has been given out annually by the state’s humanities council as part of an effort to recognize the artists, authors and organizations making valuable contributions to the culture of the state.

The LEH’s Brian Boyles says NPR’s senior news analyst and ABC News’ political commentator was a perfect fit for the award.

We know their public personas, but what do Louisiana’s statewide elected officials do when they’re off the clock?

“Collecting sports memorabilia and Louisiana history stories have been my passions, as of late,” says Lt. Governor Jay Dardenne. He loves to recount those stories he’s learned of the characters and quirks that have made the Bayou State both strange and wonderful. One of his favorite tales involves former state Senator Dudley LeBlanc of Abbeville.


Duncan Cole

This week on Inside the Arts, you'll hear how a pilot program is bringing comfort to the aching feet of school marching bands, many of which racked up miles in Carnival parades. 

Then, the Ashé Culture Arts Center is expanding its Central City campus with a multi-million dollar state-of-the art performance center and visual art gallery. We talk with executive director Carole Bebelle about plans for the new Ashé Power House.

And, New Zealand's premier contemporary dance company Black Grace makes its New Orleans debut.

This week on the Reading Life: Director of the University of New Orleans Creative Writing Workshop M.O. Walsh, whose debut novel is My Sunshine Away, and C.S. Harris, author of Who Buries the Dead, the tenth in the Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

WWNO News Director Eve Troeh visited Vietnam on assignment to report on the effects of climate change in a place with water challenges similar to New Orleans. She says it was an adventure unlike any she has recently experienced.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

The art show “Above Canal: Rights and Revival” honors New Orleans' Civil Rights Movement legacy with archival photos of local actions, activists and leaders. This history is explored alongside contemporary art that speaks to themes of neighborhood change over time.

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

If you spend any time driving, you probably know the name “Lamar.” You've no doubt seen it on a billboard. But Lamar is not a product — it’s the name of the company that owns the billboard. In fact Lamar owns more interstate billboards and outdoor advertising than just about anybody in America. And they're based in Baton Rouge.

The CEO of Lamar Advertising, Sean Reilly, is Peter's guest on Out to Lunch.

So is Susan Taylor. Susan has some outdoor artworks too. They’re in the Besthoff Sculpture Garden.

StoryCorps, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to recording, preserving and sharing the stories of Americans from all backgrounds and beliefs, will record interviews in New Orleans from March 12 to April 8 as part of its cross-country MobileBooth tour.

This week on Inside the Arts, the greatest free show on earth, Mardi Gras 2015 is here. We celebrate with a Carnival revue!

Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:45 a.m.

This week on the Reading Life:  New Orleans native, novelist T. Geronimo Johnson, author of Welcome to Braggsville, and poets Brett Evans and Chris Shipman, authors of Tit Rex Parade.

Pages