arts & culture

Michael Darda and Hali Dardar agree that when the land of southern Louisiana begins to erode into the Gulf, the Houma people will have to move, but that doesn't mean they have to let go of their culture.
StoryCorps

StoryCorps collects the voices of our time. Recently, Hali and Michael Dardar interviewed each other, but don’t be fooled by their common name — they’re not related. Before coming to StoryCorps, they’d only exchanged emails and phone calls about the Houma Language Project, an oral history project for the Houma Native American community.

Neighborhood Story Project

There’s learning to play music in the school band, and then there’s learning to play music on the street — or the bandstand — from working musicians. In New Orleans, music education has its roots as much outside the classroom as in it.

David Simon.
American Library Association via Music Inside Out

For most of his working life, David Simon has been telling an epic story of the American city — one corner at a time. First on the pages of The Baltimore Sun, then in the books Homicide: Life on the Killing Streets and The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood.

But it was on television that David Simon found his biggest and most devoted audience. NBC’s Homicide: Life on the Street and HBO’s The Corner and The Wire presented crime and punishment in an entirely new way. Detectives and criminals became extraordinarily ordinary people.

This week on the Reading Life:  Yuri Herrera, whose new novel is Signs Preceding the End of the World, and novelist George Bishop, contributor to the new anthology, A Book of Uncommon Prayer.

This week on Inside the Arts, conversation with acclaimed actress CCH Pounder a.k.a. Dr. Loretta Wade on the CBS hit series NCIS: New Orleans.

Then, the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane opens its season with an epic romance, its first production of Cymbeline. We talk with internationally celebrated Shakespeare specialist, director Rob Clare and actor Greg Baber.

And, we travel Along St.Claude with WWNO regional Edward R. Murrow award-winning producer Eve Abrams and photographer Jonathan Traviesa.

    This week on Inside the Arts, the first local production of the Broadway hit and Grammy nominated musical saga, The Color Purple, is being staged by the Anthony Bean Community Theater.  We talk with cast members.

 Then, that bodacious 4-day girls weekend getaway known as FestiGals kicks off next week. Founder Diane Lyons drops by for a sneak peek. And, we round out with New Orleans native Lisa D'Amour's Pulitzer Prize nominated play, DETROIT, presented by Southern Rep Theatre. Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:45 a.m.

StoryCorps

Conversation by conversation, interview by interview, StoryCorps collects the stories and voices of our time. This week, Littdell “Queen B” Banister and Mary Jones give us a snapshot into the lives of the Mardi Gras Indians, where personal pride is sewn into every stitch of their annual suits.

This week on Inside the Arts, chamber music and opera fuse as Lyrica Baroque presents Baroque and Beyond. We talk with nationally acclaimed soprano Sarah Jane McMahon and LPO cellist Daniel Lelchuk.

Then, Komenka Ethnic Dance and Music Ensemble will take us around the world as it celebrates its 35th Anniversary with a spring concert.

And, we round out with a spiritual uplift as the Indian Arts Circle of New Orleans presents renowned singer, Sanjeev Abhyankar, in an evening of Hindustani classical music.

This week on The Reading Life:  Bestselling author Jodi Picoult, whose new book, written with her daughter Samantha van Leer, is Off the Page, is making her first visit to New Orleans May 28.

Symphony Book Fair chair Heidi Charters and volunteer Linda Ferguson preview this year's anticipated book sale, which will feature the private collection of the late Joseph Cohen, former Tulane professor and a great New Orleans book man. And Candice Huber of Tubby and Coo's Mid-City Book Shop talks about the League of Extraordinary Readers, her debut summer reading program.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

For 37 years, John Bullard directed the New Orleans Museum of Art and oversaw many blockbuster shows during his tenure.

French Impressionists always drew large crowds, and subjects like The Gold of El Dorado and Alexander the Great were well received, but none compared to the Treasures of Tutankhamun. The ancient boy king had become a cultural sensation by the late 1970s, when New Orleans became ground zero for "Tut-Mania."

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