arts & culture

This week on Inside the Arts, the Joan Mitchell Center celebrates its Grand Opening and Artist-in-Residence Program.

Then, a love gift to the Crescent City from the land down under. Multi-award winning Australian music photographer Leon Morris releases his new book Homage: New Orleans. The coffee table book in honor of the 10th Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina is the photographer's journey of 20 years photographing the city's musical culture.

And, we round out with conversation with award-winning local artist Jax Frey.

Someone once likened Culture Collision to a trade show, but it’s so much more. This year, the annual happy-hour to kick off New Orleans’ vibrant cultural season is slated for Wednesday, September 2, from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. Culture Collision 7 will take place at The National WWII Museum's U.S. Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center, and is free and open to the public.

Skylar Fein had only lived in New Orleans for a week before Hurricane Katrina nearly tore it apart. He'd moved there to go to medical school, and found himself wandering around a wrecked city. "It's really hard to describe to someone who hadn't seen it what the streets looked like after the storm," he recalls.

Fein is among other New Orleans artists exhibiting work in shows commemorating the 10th anniversary of the 2005 storm. One thing he has in common with some of the other artists: They weren't artists before the hurricane hit.

Driving down Capitol Heights in Mid-City a few weeks back, I saw a sign in front of a house. It was...a colorful sign, to say the least, and what it said intrigued me: "Live Music - Friday - 6:30 to 8:30." I decided to check it out, and what I found was not what I expected.

“It’s a neighborhood event,"  said David Henson, leader of the Adult Music Club of Baton Rouge. "It’s not really like a music venue, like a club show or anything like that where there’s going to be a crowd of rowdy people, or anything like that; but I do like (it) – this is a pretty good little house.”


How do New Orleanians pronounce the street name Melpomene?
Jesse Hardman / WWNO

The Listening Post has teamed up with Nola.com | The Times-Picayune to produce a segment called Street Wise. First, we head out to the hardest-to-pronounce streets in New Orleans, then we hit up a linguist for a little background. 

So, how do you pronounce Melpomene?

Where da Melph at?

We took our Listening Post out to Tchoupitoulas Street to hear how New Orleanians and tourists alike pronounce the notoriously confusing street name.
Jesse Hardman / WWNO

The Listening Post has teamed up with Nola.com | The Times-Picayune to produce a segment called Street Wise. First, we head out to the hardest-to-pronounce streets in New Orleans, then we hit up a linguist for a little background. 

It's blazingly hot outside and five summer fellows from the Tulane City Center are standing in a playground at a youth center in New Orleans. The architecture students diplomatically describe the playground's design as "unintentional": There's no grass, trees or even much shade, and it's surrounded by a chain-link fence topped with barbed wire. The students, both graduate and undergraduate, are there to make the playground a little nicer.

"Right now, it feels like a prison," says Maggie Hansen, the center's interim director.

Anniversaries call for exhibitions, and art museums across New Orleans felt compelled to remember Hurricane Katrina as the 10th anniversary of its landfall approaches. But the anniversary shows at some of the city's most high-profile museums seem surprisingly understated, at least to outsiders' eyes. In fact, they barely seem to be about Katrina at all.

For the Baton Rouge Gallery's August show, three artists that work in radically different mediums seem to converge on the same theme: structure. Jason Andreasen, Executive Director of the Gallery, tells us more about Amy James, Brian Kelly and Linda Jeffers.

Carlos Lopez

This week on Inside the Arts, Broadmoor, a former 'green dot' community, celebrates the opening of a new arts and wellness center.

Then, a new museum experience is as close as your smartphone. NOMA's art galleries embrace the future with new digital technology.

And, we round out with an arts stroll down Royal Street as galleries roll out the red carpet for Dirty Linen Night.

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