arts & culture

Out To Lunch: Word

22 hours ago
Geoff Parker.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

Wherever you are right now, take a look around. There’s a fair chance that someone near you is staring at their phone. They’re not talking into it, they’re writing on it. People love writing so much they’re even texting while driving at highway speed. You’d have to really be in love with writing to risk your life for “OMG.”

Peter's guests on this edition of Out to Lunch are very connected with the current business of writing.

Angel Trumpets release some of the best smells in the city.
Scott Gold / Nolavie

When people fall in love with New Orleans -- a phenomenon that happens on a daily basis around here -- they’re wont to wax poetically about the familiar qualities that make this city such a special and enchanting place.

But all of this gushing tends to leave out a single and singular fact of life in the Crescent City: This town, for lack of a better word, smells.

Photo Credit: Christina Lessa | MistyCopeland.com

This week on Inside the Arts, a nationally acclaimed ballerina makes her debut at the 22nd annual ESSENCE Fest. We talk with ballet star Misty Copeland.

Then, Congo Square is home to a healing ceremony honoring African ancestors. The Ashe Cultural Arts Center presents its annual MAAFA Commemoration remembering the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

And, we round out with a classic work by renowned Spanish poet and playwright Federico Garcia Lorca. In Good Company presents The House of Bernarda Alba.

Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:45 a.m.

This week on The Reading Life: Bill Loehfelm, whose new Maureen Coughlin thriller is Let the Devil Out. We’ll also hear from Bethanne Patrick, editor of The Books that Changed My Life: Reflections by 100 Authors, Actors, Musicians, and Other Remarkable People. And Susan will have some recommended reading for dog lovers.

Sharon Litwin.
NolaVie.com

A driving force behind the arts and cultural communities in New Orleans has passed away. 


Nearly 100 years ago Marcel Duchamp put a porcelain urinal into a New York art gallery and changed the way we think about art. The Essence of Things is a new exhibition at the New Orleans Museum of Art that's dedicated to elevating the beauty of everyday objects. Can a rubber band or pair of flip flops rise to the level of high art? NolaVie's Renée Peck spoke with Mel Buchanan for the answer.

 

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Renée Peck.  

Kenny Platt
Ryan Kailath / WWNO

Recently, WWNO's Coastal Desk profiled an unemployed oilfield worker named Derrick Hadley. When Hadley mentioned a song called "Please Give Us One More Boom," by Robert L. Platt, we played it on air at the end of the story. A few weeks later, Robert L. Platt's son, Kenny Platt, reached out via email.


Gia Hamilton, left, of The Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans.
Tauriac Photography / The Joan Mitchell Center

The goal of the Joan Mitchell Center is to support emerging visual artists who live in New Orleans. That space is run by Gia Hamilton, who spoke with Sharon Litwin for the latest Notes from New Orleans.

This week on Inside the Arts, one of the Bard's early comedies, the Two Gentlemen of Verona opens the season for the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane.

Photo Credit: Kevin O'Mara

This week on Inside the Arts, festivals are everywhere. The French Market District is ripe and ready for its 30th celebration of the Creole tomato. 

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