Arts & Culture

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show, Harry has News of the Olympic Movement, News of Inspector's General, News of the Warm, News from Outside the Bubbl, News of the Godly, the Apologies of the Week, plus another episode of The Appresidentice, and more.

Ernie Vincent
American Routes

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. One of the enduring heroes of club life in New Orleans is guitarist Ernie Vincent. Ernie’s parents spoke French- father played guitar and harmonica, and the family used to take regular trips to Thibodaux, LA where his uncles played juke joints and fish fries. Vincent learned to play Jimmy Reed tunes, met Little Johnny Taylor and Little Freddy King.

Eugenie Saussaye, a French immigrant who founded the Vieux Carre Hair Shop in 1877.
Vieux Carre Hair Shop / Vieux Carre Hair Shop

Bill Saussaye’s family has helped decorate Mardi Gras krewes for generations. His family’s shop, the Vieux Carre Hair Shop, is not only a destination for the kings and captains of Mardi Gras, but a catalyst for keeping festival traditions alive and well.

The Vieux Carre Hair Shop was founded in 1877 by Bill Saussaye’s great-grandmother, Eugenie. The shop is now located Uptown on Maple Street and has extended hours for the Mardi Gras season. This interview was conducted by Mark Cave for the Historic New Orleans Collection and produced for WWNO by Thomas Walsh. 

Birdfoot Festival

This week on Inside the Arts, the Birdfoot Festival continues its 6th season with an exploration of the music of composer György Ligeti in a two-concert mini festival it's calling Ligeti Split, featuring British classical pianist Danny Driver.  We catch up with Danny Driver and Birdfoot artistic director, violinist Jenna Sherry by phone.

This week on The Reading Life: Mississippi writers who will be at the Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival in March! Michael Farris Smith talks about his terrific second novel, "Desperation Road," one of the best spring books so far, and Mary Miller gives us the lowdown on her unforgettable short story collection, "Always Happy Hour." Writer and yoga instructor AC Lambeth invites you to a reading/discussion series of the Indian classic, "The Ramayana," at Wild Lotus Yoga Studio.

R. Crumb
American Routes

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek at our upcoming show. To hear the full program, listen on WWNO Saturdays at 7 or Sundays at 6, or at americanroutes.org.

Photo Credit: Ronald Davis

This week on Inside the Arts, an exploration of jazz.  Acclaimed jazz drummer and composer Brian Blade and the Fellowship Band celebrate 20 years together. They perform in concert for the first time with the Loyola Symphony Orchestra.

This week on The Reading Life: New Orleanian Susan Bernofsky, whose most recent work is the translation of "Memoirs of a Polar Bear," by Yoko Tawada. She directs the literary translation program at the Columbia University School of the Arts and is is one of the leading translators of German language literature. We'll also hear from poet Stacey Balkun, whose new collection is "The Lost City Museum."

**Lagniappe Audio**

Kim Coleman / Le Musee de F.P.C.

Le Musee de F.P.C, a historic house museum, is one of the country's fewest attractions dedicated to telling the stories of free people of color and preserving their material culture. Founder, Beverly McKenna, shares the importance of this museum's narrative as the city prepares for it's tricentennial in 2018. 

To find out more about the museum of free people of color, visit http://www.lemuseedefpc.com/footsteps/

Mavis Staples
American Routes

Each week, American Routes brings you Shortcuts, a sneak peek of the upcoming show. This week, it’s the second installment of our program all about Bob Dylan.  Here’s host Nick Spitzer with Mavis Staples, on American Routes.

NS: Bob Dylan admired the civil rights songs of the Staples singers,  and would hear them on tour in the early 60s. Mavis Staples remembers when her father, Pops, heard Dylan for the first time, and how Dylan’s protest lyrics influenced their family in return.

Pages