All Things New Orleans

This week on All Things New Orleans, we checked in with our Hispanic community amid plans to construct a border wall between Mexico and the United States. We're also exploring this month's second lines with writer and videographer Big Red Cotton as we approach Mardi Gras!

WWNO's Jessica Rosgaard also talks with author, Robert Meyer about human behavior and disaster preparedness. 

NOTE: This week in New Orleans history, attorney A.P. Tureaud founded the Louis A. Martinet Legal Society on February 11, 1936.

Kim Coleman / Le Musee de F.P.C.

Le Musee de F.P.C, a historic house museum, is one of the country's fewest attractions dedicated to telling the stories of free people of color and preserving their material culture. Founder, Beverly McKenna, shares the importance of this museum's narrative as the city prepares for it's tricentennial in 2018. 

To find out more about the museum of free people of color, visit http://www.lemuseedefpc.com/footsteps/

Janae Pierre / WWNO

This week on All Things New Orleans, we spoke with APM's host of "A Prairie Home Companion", Chris Thile. We'll also share an interview from WWNO's Coastal Desk  between a young man and his grandfather who's moved several times due to flooding. 

Then a local non-profit, Right The Wrong Together, talks about bettering the relationship between the New Orleans community and law enforcement. 

Patrick Melon / Melon the Scribe

This week on All Things New Orleans, we're asking about the children in the city. Dr. Andre Perry, author of the New Orleans Youth Index, shares a statistical snapshot of the well-being of New Orleans children and youth ages 0-24. 

This week we have the latest episode of WWNO’s community engagement project The Listening Post. To kick of 2017, the team asked folks around New Orleans about the stigma of mental health in their communities and what self-care tips they recommend for keeping it together.

The Listening Post's questions for January are:

What is the BIGGEST cause of stress in your life?

What self care methods do you rely on to combat stress? 

Monika Evstatieva / NPR

This week on All Things New Orleans, NPR Special Correspondent/Host Melissa Block visits New Orleans and the WWNO radio team. 

Block shares her journey working with NPR, recollects coverage of the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina and more. 

This week on All Things New Orleans, we’ll introduce a new monthly segment featuring the city's second lines with writer and videographer, Big Red Cotton.

WWNO’s Eve Troeh talks with Cityscapes columnist Richard Campanella about New Orleans’ building styles.

And UNO’s Dr. John Alan Williams shares information about the Louisiana Tourism Forecast; particularly visitors and total spending in New Orleans for 2016-2019.

This week on All Things New Orleans, Jesse Hardman visits the final shelter in Baton Rouge on its last day open, some two months after the August flooding. Tegan Wendland discusses problems with the Red Cross' recovery efforts with ProPublica reporter Derek Kravitz. NolaVIE's Brian Friedman discusses a new festival coming to the French Quarter, and Eve Troeh speaks with a community organizer about a new method for bringing investment to the Lower Ninth Ward.

Kate Richardson

Right now, the Hispanic and Latino population in Baton Rouge is suffering with particular needs after the floods. Some of the problems are the same as those faced by Latino residents and workers after Katrina, and some are different. WWNO's "All Things New Orleans" asked Eduardo Courtade for insight on that situation, as well as other issues and events being talked about in the region's Spanish-speaking communities. He's Program Director for local stations Radio Tropical and La Fabulosa, which play music in addition to covering sports and news in Spanish.

Richard Goodman

Richard Goodman, a University of New Orleans professor of creative nonfiction writing, sits down with Jack Hope to discuss the new Storyville series — a collaboration between WWNO and the university’s Creative Writing Department.

Goodman has been at UNO for three years as an assistant professor to both graduate and undergraduate level students. Describing himself as a lifelong writer, Goodman also touched on some of his work, including his first book, French Dirt.

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