Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

If you spend any time driving, you probably know the name “Lamar.” You've no doubt seen it on a billboard. But Lamar is not a product — it’s the name of the company that owns the billboard. In fact Lamar owns more interstate billboards and outdoor advertising than just about anybody in America. And they're based in Baton Rouge.

The CEO of Lamar Advertising, Sean Reilly, is Peter's guest on Out to Lunch.

So is Susan Taylor. Susan has some outdoor artworks too. They’re in the Besthoff Sculpture Garden.

PepsiCo announced today that it was pulling a Mountain Dew ad from all its online channels, after it was buffeted by criticism.

Boyce Watkins, a professor at Syracuse University and an outspoken social critic, called the commercial "arguably the most racist commercial in history."

Jim talks with child welfare specialist Dr. Mark Courtney, from the University of Chicago, about foster care in Louisiana, and the challenges and problems therein. He's joined by Dana Hunter, from LSU's School of Social Work.

Advertising executive Hunter Territo, President of the American Advertising Federation - Baton Rouge, discusses the latest news on Governor Jindal's proposed tax reforms, and a threatened tax on media advertising.

Dan Borne, President of The LA Chemical Association and a deacon in the Catholic Church, talks about the new pontiff, Pope Francis I.

The Super Bowl XLVII TV ads told viewers they love animals, laughs and America.

Some people enjoy the Super Bowl commercials more than the football game. Host Michel Martin and Tampa Bay Times media critic Eric Deggans run through the best and worst ads; from senior citizens making late night trips to Taco Bell to nerds getting really sloppy kisses.

Mayors Against Illegal Guns, a group founded by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, is airing a 30-second spot in the Washington, D.C., area calling for background checks on all gun sales.

The predominantly black country of Jamaica is embracing a controversial Super Bowl commercial that depicts a white office worker from the U.S. Midwest feigning the Caribbean island's lilting patois accent to display a cheerful, upbeat outlook.

Some U.S. critics have described the pregame Super Bowl ad from Volkswagen of America as offensive and culturally insensitive. But the charged reaction has met with puzzlement in Jamaica, which has very visible white, Asian, Middle Eastern and mixed-race minorities that also often speak with the local accent.