Where Y'Eat

New Orleans writer Ian McNulty hosts Where Y'Eat, a weekly exploration and celebration of food culture in the Crescent City and south Louisiana.

Ian gives listeners the low-down on the hottest new restaurants, old local favorites, and hidden hole-in-the-wall joints alike, and he profiles the new trends, the cherished traditions, and the people and personalities keeping America's most distinctive food scene cooking.

 

Subscribe to Where Y'Eat as a podcast:

1. Open Itunes

2. Go to the File Menu, click on Subscribe to Podcast…

3. Enter this URL: itpc://wwno.org/podcasts/6095/rss.xml

And that’s it! New episodes download automatically.

Ways to Connect

Boiled seafood is a tradition in Louisiana with many of its own rituals.
Ian McNulty / WWNO

A visit to one West Bank seafood specialist can feel like a mini road trip out to crawfish-producing Cajun country.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

The barroom setting and vegan approach is a little unorthodox, but the Korean flavors at the Wandering Buddha are easy to love.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

As interest in barbecue billows around New Orleans, the city is seeing a a wide range of regional styles take root and meld with local traditions.

The reputation New Orleans enjoys for great food has long carried the asterisk that this just isn’t a barbecue town. But things may be starting to change.

A Forecast of Food

Mar 15, 2012
Cabbages will be flying as St. Patrick's Day parades roll in New Orleans. Just watch your face!
File photo

Long before we thought much about food culture, learned to crave complex flavors or even did our own ordering at restaurants, many of us began to fantasize about food thanks to one enduring classic of a book, "Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs."

Ian McNulty

A category of café I call "Viet Orleanian" are run by Vietnamese people, specialize in New Orleans staples and, increasingly, are started to weave a little of their own native flavors into the mix too.

Ian McNulty

Each Friday during Lent, churches around New Orleans are transformed into bustling community cafeterias, full of people, suffused with the aroma of frying fish and driven by the pulse of deep tradition.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

Traditional Turkish food finds a nontraditional setting along rejuvenating St. Claude Avenue inside the multi-modal Healing Center.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

Long a symbol of post-Katrina defiance, the refurbished sign at vintage burger joint kindles the past and points to the future.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

As turkeys were prepared in countless New Orleans kitchens this past holiday season, in the Cuban kitchen at the back of the Mid-City corner grocery Regla Store, attention turned to roasted pork legs.

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