Where Y'Eat

New Orleans writer Ian McNulty hosts Where Y'Eat, a weekly exploration and celebration of food culture in the Crescent City and south Louisiana.

Ian gives listeners the low-down on the hottest new restaurants, old local favorites, and hidden hole-in-the-wall joints alike, and he profiles the new trends, the cherished traditions, and the people and personalities keeping America's most distinctive food scene cooking.


Subscribe to Where Y'Eat as a podcast:

1. Open Itunes

2. Go to the File Menu, click on Subscribe to Podcast…

3. Enter this URL: itpc://wwno.org/podcasts/6095/rss.xml

And that’s it! New episodes download automatically.

Ways to Connect

Eat Local Challenge

In the weeks ahead, you may start seeing a different side of local food, one that might include the innovative, the overlooked or underutilized, and even the invasive.

The bar at Tujague's Restaurant, a New Orleans restaurant marking its 160th anniversary.
Ian McNulty

Give any restaurant enough time and an institutional history will accrue. Give it as much time as Tujague's has on the clock, and it can develop its own lore and legends and even some dichotomies that might seem like contradictions but end up defining the place.

Restaurants near the Lafitte Greenway are seeing a different kind of customer since the bike path opened. Po-boy purveyor Parkway Tavern & Bakery is one of them.
Ian McNulty

Look around the streets of New Orleans these days and it's impossible to miss that more people are traversing the city on bicycles.

Some restaurants and bars are noticing too, and nowhere more than a part of Mid-City that's becoming a crossroads of bike paths, a destination for in-town outings and, on nice days, a hub for people making the rounds by pedal power.

Blue Oak BBQ opened recently in Mid-City, the latest in a growing number of serious barbecue purveyors in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Is New Orleans a barbecue town? For a long time, the answer was generally, even if grudgingly, no. But times are changing.

McNulty family photo

This one is about mothers who work hard, have to juggle, still get dinner on the table, and the kids who don't really get it at the time but end up loving them even more once they finally do.

Crawfish Monica is one of the classic tastes of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.
Ian McNulty

The food served up around the Fair Grounds each year at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival isn’t typical event food. It is specifically Jazz Fest food. It rarely changes and as a result Jazz Fest regulars anticipate and crave certain dishes each year as part of their festival experience.

Primitivo is part of a new wave of business redevelopment along O.C. Haley Boulevard in the Central City neighborhood of New Orleans
Ian McNulty

The restaurant Primitivo is turning heads with some very old techniques in the kitchen, making this restaurant writer reassess some assumptions and, along the way, drawing more attention to a long-neglected business district in New Orleans.

Blackened fish took the world by storm in the 1980s and remains a standard in New Orleans.
Courtesy of Muriel's Jackson Square

Blackened fish is an icon of an earlier era of American cuisine that has stood the test of time. But it can still be a problematic dish, widely misunderstood and often tragically misinterpreted.

The diversity of the Gulf will be one of the topics at Slow Fish, an international conference in New Orleans this week.
Slow Fish

Update: Friday's Slow Fish program will be at The Broad Theater at 636 N. Broad Street. Conference only, no public festival.

The Slow Fish conference is March 10-13 at the Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave.

Its festival is held around the grounds and is free and open to the public on Friday (March 11), 3-7 p.m., Saturday (March 12), noon-6 p.m. 

See details at www.slowfish2016.com.