Voices From The Classroom

Voices from the Classroom, a series presented by NolaVie and WWNO, explores local education through conversations with those on the front lines: the teachers.

While superintendents, experts, parents, politicians and pundits have weighed in extensively on what's right and wrong with the educational system in Louisiana, it's the people behind the desks who must deal, day in and day out, with students, evaluations, testing, behavior, curriculum and, ultimately, what works and what does not.

We interviewed five local teachers, who teach in public schools in Orleans Parish, to try to understand what they face, what motivates them, and what the educational standard is today, eight years post-Katrina.

Send your comments, thoughts and observations about the series and New Orleans teachers to voices@nolavie.com.

Young Audiences Charter School

Editor's note: With Voices from the Classroom: The Arts in Education Reform, NolaVie and cultural partner WWNO — New Orleans Public Radio are teaming up to take a look at how the arts are being used creatively in schools around the city.

Why are the arts an important component for school curricula? And how are we integrating arts into local classrooms? Today, Renee Peck interviews Folwell Dunbar, head of a new kind of school in Jefferson Parish.

As part of a three-part opening conversation leading to a year-long series of vignettes on arts and education in the new public-school landscape of our city, Renee Peck talks to Echo Olander, executive director of the arts education organization KidsmART.

The series, Voices from the Classroom: The Arts in Education Reform, is a partnership of NolaVie and WWNO.

This continuing series about arts and education is made possible by a generous grant from the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation.

As part of a three-part opening conversation leading to a year-long series of vignettes on arts and education in the new public-school landscape of our city, Sharon Litwin talks to Patrick Dobard, superintendent of the Recovery School District.

The series, Voices from the Classroom: The Arts in Education Reform, is a partnership of NolaVie and WWNO.

This continuing series about arts and education is made possible by a generous grant from the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation.

Voices from the Classroom, a series presented by NolaVie and WWNO, explores local education through conversations with those on the front lines: the teachers.

While superintendents, experts, parents, politicians and pundits have weighed in extensively on what's right and wrong with the educational system in Louisiana, it's the people behind the desks who must deal, day in and day out, with students, evaluations, testing, behavior, curriculum and, ultimately, what works and what does not.

Voices from the Classroom, a series presented by NolaVie and WWNO, explores local education through conversations with those on the front lines: the teachers.

While superintendents, experts, parents, politicians and pundits have weighed in extensively on what's right and wrong with the educational system in Louisiana, it's the people behind the desks who must deal, day in and day out, with students, evaluations, testing, behavior, curriculum and, ultimately, what works and what does not.

Voices from the Classroom, a series presented by NolaVie and WWNO, explores local education through conversations with those on the front lines: the teachers.

While superintendents, experts, parents, politicians and pundits have weighed in extensively on what's right and wrong with the educational system in Louisiana, it's the people behind the desks who must deal, day in and day out, with students, evaluations, testing, behavior, curriculum and, ultimately, what works and what does not.

Kyle Walther

Voices from the Classroom, a series presented by NolaVie and WWNO, explores local education through conversations with those on the front lines: the teachers.

While superintendents, experts, parents, politicians and pundits have weighed in extensively on what's right and wrong with the educational system in Louisiana, it's the people behind the desks who must deal, day in and day out, with students, evaluations, testing, behavior, curriculum and, ultimately, what works and what does not.

Philip Razem

Voices from the Classroom, a series presented by NolaVie and WWNO, explores local education through conversations with those on the front lines: the teachers.

While superintendents, experts, parents, politicians and pundits have weighed in extensively on what's right and wrong with the educational system in Louisiana, it's the people behind the desks who must deal, day in and day out, with students, evaluations, testing, behavior, curriculum and, ultimately, what works and what does not.