Out To Lunch

Thursdays at 1:00 p.m. and Fridays at 6:30 p.m.

When you tune in to Out to Lunch, you'll find economist and Tulane finance professor Peter Ricchiuti conducting business New Orleans style: over lunch at Commander's Palace restaurant.

Each week Peter invites guests from the new world of the New Orleans business renaissance to join him. The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and Inc. magazine have all named New Orleans the best city in the U.S. to be an entrepreneur, and Out to Lunch is at the forefront of the new New Orleans.

Out to Lunch is also available on the It's New Orleans website.

Major support for Out to Lunch comes from Jones Walker and IBERIABANK. Additional support comes from LUBA Workers' Comp.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  We've all seen this guy or woman on TV, and we’ve all said, "Thank God that’s not me." The person sweating behind a bank of microphones, trying to explain away something bad. What if one day, maybe through no fault of your own, that person is you? Having to explain why things aren’t quite how they look. How do you know what to do? What to say?

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  Most businesses grow successful over time as their owners find more efficient ways to make and market specific products. It would seem counter intuitive to open a business based on products that change constantly. And products you can't even imagine, that have to be re-invented up to three and four times a year, based on the season.

That's exactly what the fashion business is. Peter's guests on tis edition of Out to Lunch today have opened fashion houses in New Orleans that make and sell handmade clothes and accessories.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  In New Orleans when we talk about "going to the airport" we automatically assume we’re talking about Louis Armstrong Airport in Kenner. But there's another airport. In Orleans Parish.

Lakefront Airport is over 80 years old. Not all those years have been great for business. For some of them the airport was boarded up. Today, Lakefront might finally be lining up for take off.

  Everybody knows right from wrong. Everybody knows numbers don’t lie. And nobody wants to spend time in prison. Why, then, would a person lie about corporate profits knowing there’s a high probability they’re going to get caught and end up behind bars?

Peter's guest on Out to Lunch wrote the book on business ethics, and it’s not theoretical.

Stephen Watson, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of the National World War II Museum.
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

In New Orleans we often take pains to point out what makes us different from other places. It’s pretty common to hear comments like, “We’re not like the rest of the country,” and “We’re not like the rest of the South.”

So it’s ironic that two of New Orleans’ newest icons are representative of the South, and the rest of the country. And they’re just a few blocks away from each other: The National World War II Museum and The Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

 In New Orleans we often take pains to point out what makes us different from other places. It’s pretty common to hear comments like, “We’re not like the rest of the country” and “We’re not like the rest of the South.”

So it’s ironic that two of New Orleans’ newest icons are representative of The South, and the rest of the country. And they’re just a few blocks away from each other: The National World War II Museum and The Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

Matt Schwarz, Linda Pompa and Peter Ricchiuti.
It's New Orleans

When people talk about which parts of New Orleans are desirable, you often hear the phrase, "block by block." Meaning, in blighted parts of town there are bright spots. And in the nicer parts of town there are areas that are not so great.

Two parts of town that have been commercially block by block are the mostly empty lots around Loyola Avenue near the Superdome, and the largely abandoned Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard.

Today, that’s all changing.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

No matter which era of recent U.S. history we look back on, we seem to be constantly working on two issues: healthcare and education.

The debate at the center of these discussions is often financial. Where is Federal or state money for reform going to come from? And if reform is privately funded, how are these fundamental requirements distributed equally?

Dennis Brady and Peter Ricchiuti.
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

A lot of tourists who come to New Orleans go home and describe the city as an oasis of European-looking streets lined with music clubs where people wander around drinking cocktails and eating beignets 24 hours a day. This fabulous wonderland is the same 13 riverside blocks that locals describe as dirty, smelly, crime-ridden, home to gutter punks, T-shirt shops, and over-priced restaurants they wouldn’t go to even if they could find a parking place.

Peter Ricchiuti and Lauren Rudzis.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

If you live in New Orleans, you're a part of the music business. Even if you never go to Jazz Fest or Bourbon Street, the revenue generated by music makes up a chunk of our local economy.

We're also tied into the empire of the world heavyweight champion of live music, Live Nation, through the local offices of Live Nation Festivals North America.

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