Notes From New Orleans

Fridays at 8:35 a.m.

Notes from New Orleans is a peek inside the life and culture of the Crescent City. Sharon Litwin, president and co-founder of NolaVie.com, covers all aspects of the unique and vibrant contributions of this creative society.

From established and emerging visual artists to the new breed of young entrepreneurs; from extraordinary musicians to world class performing artists; from Mardi Gras Indians to pop up restaurants — whether it’s going on Uptown, Downtown or Back of Town, their stories are sure to show up on Notes from New Orleans.

The Music Box Lands a Permanent Home in a Bywater Forest

Jul 14, 2016
The Music Box Roving Village
Kelley Crawford

Since its start in 2011, The Music Box has brought ambient sound art to thousands of people. While it’s built a reputation as a Roving Village, they’re now constructing a permanent installation in a 55,0000-square-foot forest with an adjoining warehouse in the Bywater.

From Islands To Delta: A Filipino's Second Homecoming

Jul 7, 2016
Robert Romero
Robert Romero

When Robert Romero first arrived in America from the Philippines over 35 years ago, he was apprehensive about adjusting to an entirely new culture. Since then, Robert has not only adopted New Orleans as his home, he’s now the honorary consul of the Philippines for the state of Louisiana. NolaVie’s Brian Friedman sat down with Robert to hear his story of coming to New Orleans and his perspective on Filipino identity.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Brian Friedman.

Angel Trumpets release some of the best smells in the city.
Scott Gold / Nolavie

When people fall in love with New Orleans -- a phenomenon that happens on a daily basis around here -- they’re wont to wax poetically about the familiar qualities that make this city such a special and enchanting place.

But all of this gushing tends to leave out a single and singular fact of life in the Crescent City: This town, for lack of a better word, smells.

Sharon Litwin.
NolaVie.com

A driving force behind the arts and cultural communities in New Orleans has passed away. 


Nearly 100 years ago Marcel Duchamp put a porcelain urinal into a New York art gallery and changed the way we think about art. The Essence of Things is a new exhibition at the New Orleans Museum of Art that's dedicated to elevating the beauty of everyday objects. Can a rubber band or pair of flip flops rise to the level of high art? NolaVie's Renée Peck spoke with Mel Buchanan for the answer.

 

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Renée Peck.  

Kenneth Schwartz.
Luisa Venegoni / Tulane Hullabaloo

Since every generation uses new buzz words, you might wonder what goes on at Tulane’s Center for Social Innovation and Design Thinking. Luckily, Sharon Litwin got an explanation from their founding director, Ken Schwartz. 

Gia Hamilton, left, of The Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans.
Tauriac Photography / The Joan Mitchell Center

The goal of the Joan Mitchell Center is to support emerging visual artists who live in New Orleans. That space is run by Gia Hamilton, who spoke with Sharon Litwin for the latest Notes from New Orleans.

Drummer Boyanna Trayanova And The Rhythm Of The Balkans

Jun 8, 2016
Just another day at the office for Boyanna Trayanova.
Kelley Crawford / Nolavie

In a city full of musicians, Boyanna Trayanova stands out. Offbeat Magazine has called her the best ska drummer in city, but she's just as likely to play traditional jazz, blues, or music from her Bulgarian homeland. She spoke with Kelley Crawford for NolaVie's series, Artists in Their Own Words

Infrogmation

Louisiana State Museums, like the Cabildo and Presbytere in Jackson Square, are feeling the strain from new budget cuts that could jeopardize their operation. To find out how this problem might be solved, NolaVie’s Sharon Litwin spoke with Mark Tullos, the Assistant Secretary for the office of State Museums.

For Architect Mark Hash, Art Is Concrete... And Abstract

Apr 20, 2016
Infrogmation

Pause for a moment and consider your neighborhood through the eyes of an architect. You’d expect geometric shapes, locations, and other spatial relationships to be foundational to their perspective, so it may surprise you to hear how abstract their creative process can be. Recently, architect Mark Hash discussed how his structured mind has changed over the years with NolaVie’s Kelley Crawford. 

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