Morning Edition

Weekdays starting at 4 a.m.
Steve Inskeep and Renée Montagne
Diane Mack

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

With the Marketplace Morning Report at 6:51 a.m., the Marketplace Tech Report at 8:47 a.m., and the GNO Info Minute at 8:59 a.m.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f970e1c817b26f4148b5|5187f939e1c817b26f414881

Pages

Planet Money
1:47 am
Thu May 24, 2012

Bankrupt In Paradise

A rainbow over the sea in Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands.
Koichi Kamoshida Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 8:05 am

The Northern Mariana Islands are about 4,000 miles west of Hawaii. They look like the kind of tropical islands you see in the movies with bright blue water and white sand beaches.

The people who live on the islands are American. The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands is a U.S. territory. And just like a lot of U.S. states, the commonwealth has a pension plan for its government employees.

Sixto Igisomar used to run it.

Read more
Mongolia Booms
9:47 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Old Ways Disappearing In The New Mongolia

A baby Bactrian camel is tied up at the edge of the Badam family's small farmstead. Bactrian camels — like all Mongolian mammals — have thick fur to withstand the winters.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 8:57 pm

Mongolia, the land of Genghis Khan and nomadic herders, is in the midst of a remarkable transition. Rich in coal, gold and copper, this country of fewer than 3 million people in Central Asia is riding a mineral boom that is expected to more than double its GDP within a decade. The rapid changes simultaneously excite and unnerve many Mongolians, who hope mining can help pull many out of poverty, but worry it will ravage the environment and further erode the nation's distinctive, nomadic identity.

Last of four parts

Read more
State of the City Address
8:30 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Mayor's Speech Gets Good Grade

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s second State of the City address is getting high marks from one expert.

Read more
State of the City Address
6:00 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Mayor Landrieu Delivers State of the City Address

Mayor Landrieu outlines his administration's accomplishments and goals in his second State of the City address.
Tyler A. Gamble Office of Mayor Mitchell J. Landrieu

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu is asking for more help in fighting crime. He used much of his hour-long State of the City address to call on federal and state governments—and the community—to battle what he calls “the first order of business.”

Read more
Around the Nation
5:42 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Construction Crew Works Gingerly Around Elephant

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Oregon officials are trying to ease the stress of road construction, at least for one resident. Two-point-two miles of the Sunset Highway are being repaved. This could disturb Rose-Tu, a pregnant elephant at the nearby Oregon zoo. The Oregonian reports highway crews will move gingerly, letting Rose-Tu grow accustomed to the noise. They hope to avoid stress from vibrations in her feet and sounds captured by those elephant ears. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

World
5:29 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Even Presidents Struggle To Keep Their Dignity

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 5:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Movies
3:41 am
Wed May 23, 2012

65th Annual Cannes Film Festival Opens In France

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 4:09 am

The movie being talked about the most at this year's Cannes Film Festival in the south of France is Michael Haneke's Amour. It's the 65th anniversary of the festival.

Afghanistan
3:41 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Afghan Public Protection Force Profile

A U.S. soldier watches members of the Afghan Public Protection Force arrive at the transition ceremony on the outskirts of the Afghan capital Kabul on March 15. The APPF replaces all private security contractors in the country.
Ahmad Jamshid AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:54 am

Nearly two years ago, Afghan President Hamid Karzai ordered that gun-toting private security companies in his country be brought under state control. But the Afghan force to replace the foreign-funded contractors is off to a rocky start.

According to the U.S. Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction (SIGAR), the new force will increase security costs for USAID projects and could even shut some of them down, at a loss of about $899 million. USAID in Kabul disagrees, and the dispute has gone public.

Read more
New Orleans: Six Years After
8:23 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

Charter Schools and the Recovery School District

In New Orleans, the city with the most public charter schools in the nation, individual charters’ standards of discipline can vary widely. Sharon Litwin investigates how the Recovery School District is dealing with challenges of equity in this new approach to public education.

Read more
New Orleans: Six Years After
8:41 am
Tue May 22, 2012

Community Trust and the New Orleans Police Department

Janet Wilson WWNO

The public’s trust in the post-Katrina New Orleans Police Department is still a fragile commodity. But the men in blue and their leadership are attempting to re-engage the communities they serve.

Read more

Pages