Morning Edition

Weekdays starting at 4 a.m.
Steve Inskeep and Renée Montagne
Diane Mack

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

With the Marketplace Morning Report at 6:51 a.m., the Marketplace Tech Report at 8:47 a.m., and the GNO Info Minute at 8:59 a.m.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f970e1c817b26f4148b5|5187f939e1c817b26f414881

Pages

Southword
2:15 am
Thu July 5, 2012

Meet Al Black: Florida's Prison Painter

Al Black is one of Florida's 26 officially recognized "Highwaymen" — a loosely affiliated group of artists who began painting in the 1960s, some of whom are still at it today.
Courtesy of Gary Monroe

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

In the 1960s, Al Black could be found cruising up and down Route 1 in his blue-and-white Ford Galaxy — with a trunk full of wet landscape paintings.

At the time, he was a salesman who could snatch your breath away and sell it back to you. As artist Mary Ann Carroll puts it, he could "sell a jacket to a mosquito in summer."

"A salesman is a con-man," Black readily admits himself today. He's a storyteller. And does he have stories to tell.

Read more
Revolutionary Road Trip
2:13 am
Thu July 5, 2012

In Libya's Shifting Sands, Kids Try To Find Their Way

Three students outside the Science College of Benghazi University. They say they expect to have opportunities in Libya that would not have been possible when Moammar Gadhafi was in power.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

In a stretch of sandy wasteland, Hisham Sadowi, 12, smacks a tee shot across a makeshift golf course in Benghazi, Libya.

On this course with no grass, local rules allowed him to place the ball on a little square of artificial turf he carries around.

Hisham dreams of becoming a professional golfer, and he stops briefly to speak to us. We asked him who his favorite golfer is.

"Tiger Woods," he exclaims.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:09 am
Thu July 5, 2012

New Orleans Struggles With Murder Rate, And Trust

Sgt. Miro Brekalo talks with residents in New Orleans' Gentilly neighborhood, as other officers walk their beat. Their goal isn't only to stop crime; it's also to connect with citizens who are often reluctant to report crimes.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

New Orleans now has the highest per capita murder rate in the country. Most of the killings are concentrated in the city's poorest neighborhoods — places like Central City, just a few blocks north of the stately mansions that line St. Charles Avenue.

The city's mayor is launching a new program aimed at cracking what he describes as a deeply rooted culture of violence. But victims complain that a failed criminal justice system has left the streets to vigilante justice, with innocent residents caught in the crossfire.

A Wounded Neighborhood

Read more
Books
2:08 am
Thu July 5, 2012

August 'Snow-Storm' Brought Devastation To D.C.

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

In 1835, Washington, D.C., was a city in transition: Newly freed African-Americans were coming north and for the first time beginning to outnumber the city's slaves. That demographic shift led to a violent upheaval — all but forgotten today.

Few of the city's buildings from that time remain, but you can still sense what it was like, if you sit in a park by the White House, as NPR's Steve Inskeep did with writer Jefferson Morley.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:07 am
Thu July 5, 2012

'Black Eden,' The Town That Segregation Built

The Idlewild Club House, Idlewild, Mich., September 1938.
Robert Abbott Sengstacke Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Sometimes history is made in the most unlikely of places.

This summer, the community of Idlewild, Mich., once known as America's "Black Eden," is celebrating its centennial — and its place in American history.

Located about 30 miles east of the larger resort city of Ludington, tucked away in the woods of the Huron-Manistee National Forests, the town was once a go-to spot for summer vacations. It was a resort unlike any other in the United States, however, and was, in essence, the town that segregation built.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:23 am
Wed July 4, 2012

A Cheesy Twist On This Indpendence Day

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with a cheesy twist on Independence Day. A replica of Mount Rushmore is on display today in West Palm Beach, Florida. This version is carved out as a 640-pound block of cheddar cheese. It was sculpted by Troy Landwehr, an expert cheese carver from, of course, Wisconsin. He told the Sun Sentinel that Abraham Lincoln's bushy eyebrows were one of the hardest features to carve. His creation is titled "My Country 'Tis of Cheese." It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:17 am
Wed July 4, 2012

Woman Flees Accident Scene To Chill Her Ice Cream

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. An Arkansas woman high-tailed it home after she rear-ended another car in Van Buren. It didn't take long for police to find her. When they did, they slapped her with a citation for following too closely and leaving the scene of an accident. Her excuse? She didn't think there was enough damage to call the cops and she was afraid her ice cream was melting. A bit of a messy alibi. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:37 am
Wed July 4, 2012

Much-Needed Rain Helps Colorado Firefighters

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

A bit of good news for Colorado. Yesterday, firefighters battling wildfires there got a boost from some much-needed rain.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The fires and drought conditions in the state prompted a firework ban for this 4th of July holiday. But an exception was made last night in Denver, where a giant crowd gathered to watch fireworks and applaud the efforts of those fighting to contain the fires.

Read more
Asia
5:26 am
Wed July 4, 2012

Pakistan Will Reopen NATO Supply Lines

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Pakistan and the United States have reached agreement to reopen the strategic land supply routes from Pakistan into Afghanistan. Pakistan closed those routes last November after a U.S. attack left 24 Pakistani soldiers dead. Pakistan had wanted a formal apology from the U.S. but the administration refused because it believed American troops had come under fire first from the Pakistani side. But yesterday, Secretary of State Clinton made comments that finally broke the logjam.

NPR's Mike Shuster has more from Islamabad.

Read more
Food
5:23 am
Wed July 4, 2012

KCRW Celebrates Summer With A Pie A Day

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 10:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And if our Pie Week isn't enough for you, how about a new pie every day?

EVAN KLEIMAN, BYLINE: I said that I was going to make a pie a day all summer. Everybody's ears pricked up.

MONTAGNE: Evan Kleiman is the host of GOOD FOOD, a program from member station KCRW in Santa Monica.

KLEIMAN: All my producers at the radio station said: You know, you really have to do this now. And I just started. And it was sort of this free-flowing thought process of I would make a pie, and then I would criticize it.

Read more

Pages