Morning Edition

Weekdays starting at 4 a.m.
Steve Inskeep and Renée Montagne
Diane Mack

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

With the Marketplace Morning Report at 6:51 a.m., the Marketplace Tech Report at 8:47 a.m., and the GNO Info Minute at 8:59 a.m.

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Media
4:00 am
Thu June 14, 2012

'A Morning Ritual': New Orleans Fights For Its Paper

A New Orleans newspaper stand holds copies of Wednesday's Times-Picayune, which announced layoffs for 200 employees.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 6:07 am

What happens when a media company wants to take away your daily newspaper? In New Orleans, you take to the streets.

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Crisis In The Housing Market
3:30 am
Thu June 14, 2012

Will Credit Be The Spoiler In Housing Recovery?

The housing market is finally showing signs of a comeback, according to an annual study from Harvard. But, though mortgage interest rates are at record lows, banks are often too cautious to lend.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 10:04 am

Amid all the economic uncertainty over the credit crisis in Europe and slow job growth in the U.S., one sector may be looking up. The U.S. housing market is finally showing more signs of recovery, according to a report being released Thursday by Harvard University.

Harvard comes out with this study once a year, and this time around, it's painting a much brighter picture.

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The Record
11:03 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

My American Dream Sounds Like Prince

Prince performing at the Fabulous Forum in Inglewood, Calif., in 1985.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 2:00 pm

I was born in 1970, sprung from one of the most aspirational generations America has ever produced: The Hip-Hop Nation. With decades of rap music anthems dedicated to our fantastical transition from poverty to prosperity, we rarely celebrate our wealth without looking back on our meager beginnings. The American Dream, for us, always represents the possibility of success and affluence on our own terms — with a watchful eye toward our hardscrabble origins.

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The Times-Picayune
6:00 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Longtime Times-Picayune Journalists Included In Staff Cuts

Erin Krall

New Orleans is set to become the largest metro area in America without a daily newspaper. The award-winning Times-Picayune is laying off half its news staff.

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Latest News
6:00 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Trial Winding Down Over Kevin Costner's Oil Clean-up Device

Star-powered testimony has wrapped up in federal court in New Orleans. Actors Kevin Costner and Stephen Baldwin are facing off over profits from a device aimed at cleaning up the BP oil spill.

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Strange News
5:40 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Bacon Tops New Burger King Dessert

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 6:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Strange News
5:35 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Director Boyle Unveils Pastoral Olympics Opener

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 6:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

London 2012: The Summer Olympics
4:21 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Fencing's Father-Son Duo Hones An Olympic Dream

Alexander Massialas (left) lands a touch on Britain's Keith Cook during last year's Fencing International Invitation in London.
Sang Tan AP

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 7:17 pm

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Energy
4:12 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Ruling Could Help Break The Nuclear-Waste Logjam

About 70,000 tons of used nuclear fuel sits mostly at power plants across the country. Much is kept underwater in spent fuel pools, but utility companies have been moving the fuel into concrete and steel casks like these in Richland, Wash. Energy Northwest CEO Vic Parrish (center) tours the facility with Reps. Doc Hastings (left) and Jay Inslee.
Shannon Dininny AP

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 11:43 am

The federal government promised almost 30 years ago to find a place to bury nuclear waste from power plants. It hasn't. So the waste is piling up at power plants around the country.

Now a federal court says the government must prove that this temporary solution is truly safe. The decision could help break the nuclear-waste logjam.

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Planet Money
4:03 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Spain's Bank Matchmaker On What Went Wrong

Angel Borges, matchmaker.
Chana Joffe-Walt NPR

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 7:55 pm

A couple years ago, Spain hatched a plan to help its small, regional banks. The banks, called cajas, had made lots of bad loans during Spain's real estate bubble.

The plan: Merge the bad cajas with the good ones, in order to make the losses more manageable and bring down overhead.

The government brought in Angel Borges, a banking consultant from Madrid, as a sort of yenta — a matchmaker who was supposed to help the cajas get together.

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