Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m.
Kai Ryssdal

The award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program — with an irreverent reporting style all its own — airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television.

In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

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Business
5:00 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Marketplace Morning Report for Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Business
12:00 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Where everybody knows your game

The Chromatic Dragon in Savannah, Georgia—a place to eat, drink and game.  
Elaine Jones

Geek culture is having a bit of a moment. Superheroes are smashing box office records. Comic conventions have become national news. Now, gamers are getting their very own bars. A new pub in Savannah, Georgia is offering a place to throw back a few drinks while you battle it out in video or board games.

Walking into the Chromatic Dragon feels like entering most bars — at first. You decide if you want to sit at the bar or get a table; inside or out. A friendly employee approaches, but he’s not a server. He’s a "game master."

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Business
12:00 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Here's why we care about durable goods

In Chicago, pedestrians walk by a furniture store, where sales can help indicate broader economic trends. 
Nova Safo

Why do we care about the durable goods report, which the U.S. Census Bureau publishes each month to tell us how big-ticket item sales are going? Let Ian Shepherdson, chief U.S. economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, explain.

"We get lots of information about what businesses are saying, but they don't always do what they say they're going to do," Shepherdson says.

The durable goods report, he says, is a hard-data antidote to that problem. "The one thing that businesses don't do if they're worried about the future is invest large amounts in new equipment."

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Business
12:00 am
Tue May 26, 2015

Marketplace Tech for Tuesday, May 26, 2015

 Matilde Hoffman works on her computer at a coffee shop in New York City. 
Marketplace
Business
9:08 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Vista Theatre is a one-screen wonder

The Vista Theater's one screen means picking the right movie is crucial to business.
Adrienne Hill and Bridget Bodnar

There aren’t a whole lot of 92-year-old theaters left in the country. For the Vista Theatre in Hollywood, success means walking a fine line: adapt to the changing times while holding on to the motif from days gone by. With just one screen, there’s not a lot of room for error.

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Business
8:15 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Marketplace for Monday, May 25, 2015

Barrels of Woodford Reserve bourbon age in a rickhouse in Versailles, Kentucky.
Adrienne Hill and Robert Garrova
Business
7:55 am
Mon May 25, 2015

My First Job: Printing professional

Robert Garrova

When Shahrouz Varshabi was about 17 years old, he was accepted to a college outside of his hometown in Iran.

This was good news for Varshabi, but it also meant a financial strain for his parents.

“I was feeling so bad about the situation because I was coming from a sort of poor family, and I didn’t want to have pressure on my father’s shoulders,” Varshabi says.

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Business
7:24 am
Mon May 25, 2015

A shot of 'America's native spirit'

Barrels of Woodford Reserve bourbon age in a rickhouse in Versailles, Kentucky.
Adrienne Hill and Robert Garrova

During the course of writing his book, “Bourbon Empire: The Past and Future of American Whiskey,” Reid Mitenbuler learned a lot about “America’s native spirit,” as it’s known.

According to Mitenbuler — contrary to what you might assume from looking at bottle labels — today’s bourbons aren’t all made by bearded men wearing overalls.

“By the year 2000 you have eight companies, 13 plants, and they make about 99 percent of all the whiskey in America,” Mitebuler says.

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Business
6:49 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Military families turn to food stamps

Gavin Shaw, 5, flashes a smile as he hugs his father, Master Sgt. Adam Shaw, during a welcome home ceremony for soldiers returning from Afghanistan to Fort Carson, Colorado, in 2012.
Karen Clark

growing number of working people use food stamps to help make ends meet. Often they work in retail, food and service industry jobs, where pay is traditionally low. But there’s another group of working people turning to food stamps that might surprise you: active-duty military personnel and their families.

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Business
5:13 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Charter near a deal to buy Time Warner

Charter Communications is reportedly close to buying Time Warner Cable.
Adrienne Hill

It's a cable company-eat-cable-company world out there.

The New York Times reports: 

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Pages

Podcasts

  • Monday, May 25, 2015 1:15pm
    Airing on Monday, May 25, 2015: Reporter Krissy Clark from Marketplace's Wealth & Poverty desk explains why a large number of military families are reliant on food stamps, guest host Adriene Hill heads to the Vista Theatre to see how a one-screen venue decides what movie to play (while staying in business), and author Reid Mitenbuler looks at how bourbon became America's whiskey.
  • Friday, May 22, 2015 4:00pm
    Airing on Friday, May 22, 2015: The nation’s poultry industry is facing an unprecedented avian flu epidemic.  Millions of birds have been slaughtered to try and contain the disease, which is causing an egg shortage. Next: consumer prices, as measured by the Labor Department, ticked up 0.1 percent last month — a bit more if you discount big swings in food and energy costs. We look at why some things get removed from the “core” rate and why the Federal Reserve, for example, uses a different measure when trying to assess inflation.  
  • Thursday, May 21, 2015 4:00pm
    Airing on Thursday, May 21, 2015: This week’s oil spill off Santa Barbara’s coast may be small, but this is where the modern environmental movement in the U.S. had an awakening. A large oil spill in the region back in 1969 helped spur the creation of groups like the Natural Resources Defense Council. Next: CVS is seeking to buy pharmacy services provider Omnicare for about $13 billion, including debt. We look at the thinking behind the bid.    
  • Wednesday, May 20, 2015 4:00pm
    Airing on Wednesday, May 20, 2015: Five of the world's largest banks, including Citigroup and J.P. Morgan Chase, have been fined $5.7 billion for manipulating foreign exchange rates. The institutions rigged the benchmark London interbank offered rate, or LIBOR. We look at why LIBOR is important and matters to all of us. Next: One country’s currency manipulation is another’s monetary policy. Adding currency controls to the Trans Pacific Partnership is mired in controversy. We explain why by looking at the arguments for and against the partnership, and why this puts the U.S. in a tricky spot. 
  • Tuesday, May 19, 2015 4:00pm
    Airing on Tuesday, May 19, 2015: The San Francisco Federal Reserve suggests an improved way to crunch official growth statistics. The director of research at the San Francisco Fed says that there should be a second, final seasonal adjustment to GDP data—on top of the seasonal adjustments the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) currently makes. Next: a new report shows that ethics continue to be an issue on Wall Street. Nearly one-third of those making more than $500,000 said they “have witnessed or have firsthand knowledge of wrongdoing in the workplace.” Why do the incentives of finance lure people to do wrong? And why is that so hard to change? We explore.