Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m.
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

The award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program — with an irreverent reporting style all its own — airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television.

In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

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Justin Ho

With recreational marijuana getting all the attention these days, it’s easy to forget how far the medical marijuana industry has come since California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana in 1996. Today, Arcview Market Research estimates that the legal medical marijuana industry pulls in $4.7 billion in consumer spending.

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Marketplace

Amid news that White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer has been checking staffers' phones, multiple reports say that government officials have been using encrypted chat apps. We'll look at exactly what information becomes federal record and what doesn't. Next, we'll discuss what current stock market optimism means for venture capitalism, along with Elon Musk's announcement that two people have paid a hefty sum to go on a weeklong mission around the moon.

What's your movie 'constituency'?

22 hours ago
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Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

Last night’s Oscar show had some upsets — even without that envelope snafu. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal talked with New York Times culture critic Wesley Morris about what just happened at the Oscars and why even movies are more polarizing than they used to be. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation.

President Donald Trump’s administration promises a very different trade approach than its predecessors. Trump and his team have criticized trade deals involving multiple countries, preferring to work with countries one-on-one. It appears multilateral deals are out and bilateral deals are in.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Textbook publishers in a bind as students go digital

23 hours ago

Pearson, the global education publisher, announced a nearly $3.3 billion loss for 2016. It's struggling, as many traditional publishers are, with big shifts in the way college kids buy (or don’t buy) textbooks. According to the National Association of College Stores, spending on course materials has fallen 14 percent in the last 10 years. Students are renting digital versions or buying used books. Pearson said it is investing nearly $930 million a year to make a transition to digital. But there are other challenges for publishers as well.

Trump’s spending plan isn’t all that new

23 hours ago

In his speech to a joint session of Congress tomorrow night, President Donald Trump will outline his approach to budgeting: a big boost to defense spending and no cuts to entitlements like Medicaid or Social Security. That means reductions for domestic programs. But Trump's budget proposal really changes very little about the nation's federal spending priorities.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Why Wall Street needs courageous leadership

23 hours ago
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Kai Ryssdal and Robert Garrova

In the American psyche, few phrases have more baggage attached to them than “Wall Street.” Depending on whom you talk to, Wall Street is either the backbone of American capitalism or part of a rigged system that makes the rich richer. William Cohan worked on Wall Street for 17 years and has written several books on the subject. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal talked with him about his latest book, “Why Wall Street Matters.” Below is an edited transcript of their conversation.

02/27/17: Trump's spending plan isn't new

Feb 27, 2017
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Marketplace

President Donald Trump will outline his approach to budgeting tomorrow in a speech to a joint session of Congress. It goes like this: a big boost to defense spending and no cuts to entitlements like Medicaid or Social Security. That means reductions for domestic programs. But Trump's budget proposal really changes very little about the nation's spending priorities. Later in the show, we'll talk with Wisconsinites who are watching Trump's promises very closely, and, of course, we're talking about the Oscars.

A simple blood test could help doctors determine whether someone suffers from coronary heart disease, the most common form of heart disease, killing more than 370,000 Americans every year. This test may more accurately identify the condition compared to the current crop of diagnostic tools, including stress tests and CT scans. If approved by the FDA, the blood test could improve health and save money. Or, if adopted widely, the test could become overprescribed, adding to wasteful health spending estimated to be $1 trillion annually. 

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