Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m.
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

The award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program — with an irreverent reporting style all its own — airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television.

In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

The hidden fallout of Brexit

Jun 24, 2016
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Andy Uhler

Wall Street's head is still spinning from the Brexit, but the fallout is short-term. We spoke with experts who said U.K.'s split from the European Union will have us talking about what this means for businesses and the global economy for the next decade.

Fiona Hill, director of the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution

Currency traders take a wild ride during Brexit

Jun 24, 2016

Foreign currency traders spent the night glued to their screens as the results came in that U.K. decided to leave the European Union. Yra Harris is a Chicago-based veteran trader who shares his experience trading the pound during the Brexit vote.

Click the audio player to listen to his story.

Yes, the Brexit is about immigration

Jun 24, 2016
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Golda Arthur

Brexit was in large part driven by an anti-immigration backlash, but exactly what kind of immigration was in the firing line?

Not just the migrants who have been in our headlines for the last year, the flow of refugees moving out of Syria and the Middle East and crossing in boats and trucks to Europe.

The target for this hardened stance on immigration was Europe itself: in particular, Eastern Europeans from countries like Poland, who have been moving to Britain in large numbers over the past decade or so.

What does Brexit mean for you?

Jun 24, 2016
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Kim Adams

What happened?

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Kai Ryssdal

There's a context slice of the Brexit story that we need to get to before the day is done -- the place that Thursday's vote has in the global economy, and in history, really.

Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers wrote a quick post last night for The Washington Post. We got him on his cell phone Friday to talk more about it:

The future of the Bank of England's governor

Jun 24, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about a drop in the value of the British pound following the recent Brexit vote; David Cameron's decision to step down as prime minister; and whether the governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, will remain in his position. 

What U.S. leaders have to say about Brexit

Jun 24, 2016
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Greta Hallberg

The final votes were tallied early Friday morning and the U.K. voted to leave the European Union, rattling global markets. Here are the official statements about the news from major U.S. players:

The Federal Reserve:

What you should do when the markets go crazy

Jun 24, 2016
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Kim Adams

Prepare for a lot of red today. Global markets are down in response to the U.K. referendum to leave the European Union. Some traders are saying they haven’t seen volatility like this since 2008, which can be a lesson for individual investors.

When markets go crazy, investors seeing sharp declines in their retirement or other accounts might feel the urge to sell and cut their losses. Jennifer Myers, a financial planner and president of Sagevest Wealth Management in Virginia, warned that people shouldn’t panic.

A look at Brexit's impact on Asia

Jun 24, 2016
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Rob Schmitz

As it became clear overnight that Britain will be leaving the European Union, markets in Asia were the first to react. In Seoul, markets tumbled nearly 4 percent. The stock markets of Hong Kong and Shanghai were down. 

And in Japan, the Nikkei was down 8 percent. Stocks in the country suffered their worst day in five years.

At the start of the day, the yen was trading at 106 to the dollar — that dropped to 99 to the dollar as global investors sought a safe haven for their money, said Gavekal Dragonomics’ Arthur Kroeber.

Some still optimistic in the face of Brexit vote

Jun 24, 2016
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Marketplace staff

The U.K. has decided to leave the European Union, casting uncertainty over immigration, trade and the world's financial markets. "Leave" voters won 52 percent to 48 percent, according to our partners at the BBC. 

But despite the turmoil that global markets and "Remain" voters  are currently facing, some business leaders are still projecting enthusiasm about the region's future. 

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