Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m.
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

The award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program — with an irreverent reporting style all its own — airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television.

In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

Seventy and a half. That is the magic age that starts mandatory withdrawals from 401(k)s and other tax-deferred retirement accounts. The oldest members of the baby boom generation start hitting that age this year, and the milestone is expected to have significant implications for the financial services industry.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

The Common Application gets an update

7 hours ago

The application used by thousands of high school students to apply to colleges is going to get a new version, one that tailors to a large but under-recognized portion of the student population. The Common Application will roll out an updated transfer version next year that tailors to students such as parents with children who are returning to school to complete a degree, veterans and older transfer students.

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Aaron Schrank

Tommy Diaz was looking to make a career move after graduating community college in 2008, so he joined the U.S. Army. In 2010, he was deployed to Bagram, Afghanistan, where he worked in military intelligence.

“I talked with high-level Taliban members,” Diaz said. “I did over 400 debriefings. The euphemism is debriefings. They’re really interrogations.”

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Marketplace

Campaign money used to be spent on things like outdoor posters and television advertisements. Now much of that is going to Facebook. On today's show, we'll discuss how big of a role the social media giant is playing in U.K. elections, specifically, and lessons that the country is learning from the Trump campaign. Afterwards, we'll take a look at the mechanics behind the cloud content management company Box, and then talk about the latest addition to the hotel  industry: robots.

This robot's coworkers think he is kinda cute

9 hours ago
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Jana Kasperkevic

When the doors to Chicago’s Hotel EMC2 opened this past Wednesday, Leo and Cleo were ready to get to work. Decked out in their coattails, their name tags proudly on display, the two newest additions to the team have created quite a stir — both among the staff and the guests. You see, Leo and Cleo are not your typical hotel employees. They are about 3 feet tall and they can work around the clock.

Hospitality robots, it turns out, are here. And they are kind of cute. 

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Marketplace

Frustrating air travel isn't just an American problem — this weekend, British Airways had to cancel and postpone hundreds of flights due to a massive computer failure. The BBC's Andrew Walker joins us to talk about what this'll cost the company, both financially and in terms of its relationship with customers. Next, we'll discuss the Common App's decision to create a new form aimed at being more transfer student-friendly, and then look at the challenges associated with retaining veteran employees. 

Why Ramadan is a big deal for Arab TV networks

May 26, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal and Maria Hollenhorst

This Saturday marks the beginning of Ramadan. Muslims worldwide will spend the next 30 days fasting from dawn until dusk. But when families gather to break the fast after the sun goes down, many observe another Ramadan tradition — binge-watching television. Arab TV networks craft content with widespread appeal in the Islamic community for this time of year, but it's also a way to shape public opinion. Marwan Kraidy is a professor of communications at the University of Pennsylvania and an expert on Arab media.

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Kai Ryssdal

Jared Kushner is the son-in-law of the president of the United States, a senior official in the Trump White House and, according to some reports, a person of interest in the FBI's investigation of the Trump campaign and Russian interference. He's also a big name in commercial real estate. Although he's stepped away from a formal role managing his family's real estate businesses, he's still a beneficiary of the company and its investments.

The Department of Education isn't your typical go-to for high drama in Washington, D.C. But this week hasn't been typical. First, President Trump's budget proposal called for drastic cuts to the department's budget. Then, James Runcie, who oversaw the office that manages the federal government's $1.3 trillion student loan portfolio, walked.

Trump sounds off about Germany's trade surplus, again

May 26, 2017

President Trump sounded off in a meeting with G-7 officials yesterday, allegedly saying that Germany is “bad, very bad” for running up a trade surplus with the U.S., selling millions of cars on American shores. This is not the first time the president has called out Germany on trade, and it’s safe to say that the U.S. relationship with one of its closest allies has chilled considerably since January. But, politics aside, the manufacturing relationship between Germany and the U.S. is gigantic.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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