Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m.
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

The award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program — with an irreverent reporting style all its own — airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television.

In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Airing on Tuesday, September 2, 2015: On today's show, we'll talk about the victory for Uber drivers in court; how nixing the Iran nuclear deal could undermine the dollar's status in the global economy; and the stranglehold Universities often have over their own branding.

Using colleges' names? They're looking for you.

9 hours ago
Gigi Douban

It’s that time of year again — college students are back on campus. It’s also the busy season for college and university licensed merchandise, from hoodies to umbrellas. The collegiate merchandise market takes in $4.6 billion in annual sales. That’s up from $2.9 billion 10 years ago. And the revenue from those licenses is fiercely protected. 

Marketplace Tech for Wednesday, September 2, 2015

9 hours ago
Marketplace

Airing on Wednesday, September 2, 2015: On today's show, we'll talk about the impact of China’s slow down on electronic parts makers, and Katie Notopoulos of Buzzfeed joins us to talk about "Duck Army."

Why buy water when you can have it for free?

22 hours ago
Molly Wood and Mukta Mohan

Despite having some of the best and safest tap water in the entire world, most of us are buying bottled water in droves.  Our love for drinking water out of little plastic bottles is creating an environmental disaster, and we're spending money to buy water that we could be drinking for free. Roberto Ferdman wrote about how bottled water is becoming the drink of choice in American households for the Washington Post.

A snapshot of Polaroid’s turnaround

22 hours ago
Molly Wood and Daisy Palacios

Polaroid is back in the camera game with the Cube, a tiny action camera, as well as an instant snapshot printer. As a brand, it's name is on televisions and even a line of low-cost Android phones mainly sold in Mexico.

The company has also been raising its profile at big consumer electronics events, like IFA, happening this week in Berlin.

Since becoming CEO of Polaroid, Scott Hardy has helped put the company on a successful track.

Marketplace for Tuesday, September 1, 2015

22 hours ago

Another stock market plunge, StubHub's pricing model and conflict within the European Union over the migrant crisis. 

Migrant crisis challenging EU identity

22 hours ago
Kim Adams

The European Union is threatening legal action against several of its member states. The branch of that economic bloc which deals with migration says at least 10 countries — they won’t say which ones — are being served a final warning. Why? The EU says these countries are not properly following procedures for dealing with asylum seekers.

When markets are turbulent, it's time for Rule 48

22 hours ago
Mark Garrison

Many of the recent wild openings of the stock market came with a footnote: the New York Stock Exchange invoked Rule 48. Tuesday was one of those days. Normally an obscure rule in a rulebook full of them, Rule 48 is currently having a star turn because of recent volatile trading.

Nova Safo

So much for that approach: StubHub, the online ticket reseller, has bagged its all-inclusive pricing model. Seems ticket buyers don't really like the full truth, even if they ask for it.  

The plan, first instituted in January of 2014,  factored all fees into the stated price of a ticket. StubHub's research showed that buyers want transparency. 

Helping low-income college students feel at home

22 hours ago
Amy Scott

Gabriel Ramos remembers the first time he felt out of place at Vassar College. He was in his dorm, talking to a fellow student about high school. When the student had been assigned a project about the Holocaust, his family flew to Europe to visit Holocaust museums.

“I was like, ‘okay, you are very different from me,” Gabe recalls thinking.

Gabe did not grow up in the kind of family that could just jet off to Europe to do field research. His mom worked as a bus driver. His dad moved from job to job. Neither parent went to college.

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