Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m.
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

The award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program — with an irreverent reporting style all its own — airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television.

In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

The No. 1 challenge of retirement

Feb 17, 2017

Working Americans who save for retirement spend a lot of time and energy making decisions on how to save. It’s confusing, it’s hard. But you know what? It doesn’t get any easier when you hit retirement. One of the biggest stresses is trying to organize your finances when you don’t know how long you’re going to be around to need them. Economists have a favorite method for dealing with this anxiety: It’s called an income annuity, but it’s not quite a household name yet.  

NASA is the government’s space agency, but not all of what NASA does is linked to space. A good portion of its work is more inward looking and has to do with our own planet — things like weather and climate change. Some Republicans are talking about rebalancing NASA's priorities and moving away from that research and refocusing on space exploration. But what potential impacts could that rebalancing have? 

What was missing from Facebook’s 5,000-word manifesto

Feb 17, 2017
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Marketplace

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg shared some deep thoughts this week in a long essay about where he sees humanity going online. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke with senior tech correspondent Molly Wood about what the nearly 5,000-word treatise had to say. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation. 

Kai Ryssdal: So here it is, 5,700-something words from Mark Zuckerberg. Yes, 1.9 billion people use Facebook, but it seemed to me there was no "there there" in this thing. There was no action coming out of this.

U.S. food company Kraft Heinz offered $143 billion for the British-Dutch consumer goods conglomerate Unilever. Unilever rejected the proposal, but Kraft Heinz said it looks forward to reaching an agreement on the terms of a transaction. If the deal does eventually go ahead, it would be one of the largest acquisitions on record. It's just a year since Heinz and Kraft Foods merged, but these big-time mergers are nothing new for the industry.

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Sam Beard

In Europe, Brexit has put Grexit in the shade. The British vote to leave the European Union has dominated the economic headlines since last summer’s referendum and overshadowed the fear that Greece — the EU’s most vulnerable and debt-laden country — would crash out of the Eurozone. But could Grexit be poised for a comeback? We may get the answer on Monday. Euro finance ministers meet to consider whether the Greeks should get the next installment of their bailout money, money they must have before July if they are to avoid defaulting on some of their loans.

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Sam Harnett

CEO Bill Phelps says his thoughts on minimum wage have evolved. In 1994, Phelps co-founded the fast food chain Wetzel’s Pretzels, which has almost a hundred outlets in California.

“Like most business people,” Phelps said, “I was concerned about it a couple of years ago when California started raising the minimum wage."

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Eliza Mills

Dalton State College in Dalton, Georgia, attracts students from all over Georgia and all over the world, but the manufacturing city it calls home still has a strong influence on the small campus. Dalton is where most of the carpet in the United States is produced, and many of the students here have parents who work in the carpet industry or are preparing themselves for science and tech jobs in manufacturing. 

Weekly Wrap: 8 years since Obama's stimulus package

Feb 17, 2017

Leigh Gallagher of Fortune and Sudeep Reddy of Politico join Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal to discuss the week's business and economic news. This week, they talk about the Federal Reserve: Chair Janet Yellen's trip to the Hill, Daniel Tarullo's resignation from the board of governors and how President Donald Trump will tackle forming a new Fed. Also, eight years ago today, then-President Barack Obama signed an $800 billion stimulus package. Why hasn't Trump followed through with any direct action for the economy yet? 

02/17/2017: Total global dominance by Facebook

Feb 17, 2017
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Marketplace

A. Lot. Happened. This. Week. We're here to wrap it up. Leigh Gallagher of Fortune and Sudeep Reddy of Politico join host Kai Ryssdal to review the week that was. We'll also talk about that 5,700-word letter posted yesterday by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and what it all means. We also hear from a CEO in California who says the state's increase in minimum wage has been great for his business.

02/17/17: The rise of athlete activism

Feb 17, 2017

Americans are having trouble paying back their auto loans. We'll look at whether these delinquent payments pose risks to the financial system. Next, we'll discuss why there's been a rise in activism among athletes — especially among NBA players — and a plan in Washington that would keep water flowing to high-value crops.

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