Marketplace

Weekdays at 6 p.m.
Kai Ryssdal

The award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us." The 30-minute program — with an irreverent reporting style all its own — airs weekday evenings on more than 320 public radio stations nationwide and boasts the largest audience for any business program in the United States on radio, cable or network television.

In conjunction with Marketplace Morning Report and Marketplace Money, this trio of financial programming covers listeners from wallet to Wall Street.

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Business
1:00 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Your funeral home may be ripping you off

Funeral homes have long been accused of scamming customers, who are spending lots of money when they’re grieving, and vulnerable.
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Every year, the Federal Trade Commission conducts an undercover investigation to make sure funeral homes are following the FTC’s funeral rule to give customers a price list immediately and to not sell unnecessary, unwanted services.

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Business
1:00 am
Mon May 25, 2015

PODCAST: Show me the money, airlines

A Southwest Airlines jet takes off from Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport. 
Matt Nesto

Asian stocks spring while most of the world's stock takes a breather. More on that. Plus, lower fuel prices have translated into huge savings for airline companies. Very little of those savings are being passed along to customers. So, what are the airlines doing with all of that money? And on a quest to invent a smart smoker, a Harvard engineering class is partnering with Williams Sonoma. We check in on their results.

Business
12:00 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Cheaper fuel, cheaper flights. But not for you.

With the price of jet fuel at a low, the question is...where are the savings going?
Sabri Ben-Achour

A gallon of jet fuel will cost you around $1.66 a gallon these days. That’s down 40 percent from what it was this time last year.

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Business
12:00 am
Mon May 25, 2015

At Harvard, even the meat smoker is smart

Peyton Nesmith, a teaching fellow, makes final preparations prior to the taste test between brisket cooked in a commercial competitor and one cooked by the Harvard smoker.
Sam Kaplan

On a quest to invent a smart smoker, a Harvard engineering class is partnering with Williams-Sonoma. Over the last few months, junior-year engineering students have smoked more than 200 pounds of brisket. The result? Well, as a self-admitted meat lover, I figured the only way to really know was to take a bite.

It wasn't hard to find the class. The mesquite aroma led me right to teaching assistant Peyton Nesmith. The Alabama native is tending a 300 pound, black, hour glass shaped ceramic smoker. The contraption is covered with wires, gadgets and gizmos.

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Business
12:00 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Late springs warms up housing

Spring has sprung for the housing market.
Mitchell Hartman

Spring and summer are often a hopeful time for anyone involved in the housing economy. Houses show well. Potential buyers go looking. Homebuilders are building.

Bad winter weather in early 2015 made for a poor start to the year for housing. But figures for April suggest the housing economy might finally be on the rebound. “Improvement in housing really has been a missing piece to this recovery,” says Michael Baele, managing director of U.S. Bank’s wealth management division. “And we are encouraged to see some better numbers.”

Here are some key recent housing indicators:

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Business
12:00 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Marketplace Tech for Monday, May 25, 2015

Marketplace
Business
11:57 pm
Sun May 24, 2015

The oil economy, as measured in hotdogs and U-Hauls

Brian Way, a U-Haul store manager, said the rental facility in Williston, N.D. had more customers leaving town than arriving. Way now works at a U-Haul in Fargo, N.D.
Annie Baxter

You can learn a lot about the economy in Williston, North Dakota, based on Mitch Petrasek’s recent hot dog consumption. 

When I met him in March outside the U-Haul where he was working in Williston, the capital of the state’s oil patch, he had eight dogs lined up on a grill.

“I'll eat two now, two for dinner and two for breakfast,” he says. The remaining two, he says, would be offered to his boss.

Petrasek’s diet includes a few other things, like power bars and granola bars — the kind of stuff that didn't need to be warmed up or refrigerated.

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Business
11:00 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Marketplace for Friday, May 22, 2015

The U.S. is facing an egg crisis. 
Marketplace
Business
11:00 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Why the CPI doesn't figure in the Fed's calculations

Shoppers walk along Lexington Avenue in New York City in April. Consumer prices rose 0.1 percent last month.
Tim Fitzsimons

The Consumer Price Index rose by 0.1 percent last month, according to figures out Friday. You could think of it as one more piece of evidence in the "no inflation" pile.

The CPI is used for a variety of things, particularly in adjusting rent and wages, as well as "in private contracts to escalate values of money ... by the government ... to adjust social security, and so forth," says Steve Reed, an economist at the Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics who works on the CPI.

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Business
11:00 am
Fri May 22, 2015

States take back some economic incentives

Missouri suspended incentives for IBM after the company laid off workers in Columbia.
Gigi Douban

The state of Missouri recently suspended its incentives program for IBM after the company reported layoffs at a new center it had opened in Columbia. The state said IBM didn't make good on its promise to maintain at least 500 jobs there. Other states are also taking a hard look at economic incentives they granted to businesses to relocate or open new facilities.

Pages

Podcasts

  • Friday, May 22, 2015 4:00pm
    Airing on Friday, May 22, 2015: The nation’s poultry industry is facing an unprecedented avian flu epidemic.  Millions of birds have been slaughtered to try and contain the disease, which is causing an egg shortage. Next: consumer prices, as measured by the Labor Department, ticked up 0.1 percent last month — a bit more if you discount big swings in food and energy costs. We look at why some things get removed from the “core” rate and why the Federal Reserve, for example, uses a different measure when trying to assess inflation.  
  • Thursday, May 21, 2015 4:00pm
    Airing on Thursday, May 21, 2015: This week’s oil spill off Santa Barbara’s coast may be small, but this is where the modern environmental movement in the U.S. had an awakening. A large oil spill in the region back in 1969 helped spur the creation of groups like the Natural Resources Defense Council. Next: CVS is seeking to buy pharmacy services provider Omnicare for about $13 billion, including debt. We look at the thinking behind the bid.    
  • Wednesday, May 20, 2015 4:00pm
    Airing on Wednesday, May 20, 2015: Five of the world's largest banks, including Citigroup and J.P. Morgan Chase, have been fined $5.7 billion for manipulating foreign exchange rates. The institutions rigged the benchmark London interbank offered rate, or LIBOR. We look at why LIBOR is important and matters to all of us. Next: One country’s currency manipulation is another’s monetary policy. Adding currency controls to the Trans Pacific Partnership is mired in controversy. We explain why by looking at the arguments for and against the partnership, and why this puts the U.S. in a tricky spot. 
  • Tuesday, May 19, 2015 4:00pm
    Airing on Tuesday, May 19, 2015: The San Francisco Federal Reserve suggests an improved way to crunch official growth statistics. The director of research at the San Francisco Fed says that there should be a second, final seasonal adjustment to GDP data—on top of the seasonal adjustments the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) currently makes. Next: a new report shows that ethics continue to be an issue on Wall Street. Nearly one-third of those making more than $500,000 said they “have witnessed or have firsthand knowledge of wrongdoing in the workplace.” Why do the incentives of finance lure people to do wrong? And why is that so hard to change? We explore.     
  • Monday, May 18, 2015 4:00pm
    Airing on Monday, May 18, 2015: Target is demoting packaged foods, promoting them less as it emphasizes produce and organic foods in its grocery departments. We take a look at how this could affect big food companies and what Target customers might expect to see on shelves. Next: The White House is providing grants to local police departments in exchange for adopting guidelines from President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing, including wearing body cameras. We explore whether these departments will accept the grant offers.