Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Friend Remembers Andrew Pochter, American Student Killed In Egypt

Andrew Driscoll Pochter, who died while photographing clashes between opponents and supporters of President Mohamed Morsi in Alexandria, Egypt. (AP/Pochter Family)

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 11:03 am

The body of Andrew Pochter, the 21-year old American student stabbed to death during the uprising in Egypt, is scheduled to arrive in the United States from Egypt Friday.

U.S. officials are still trying to determine if Pochter was targeted or was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Meryn Chimes, a friend of Pochter, spoke of his work involvement in the region.

“Andrew had a passion for that area and those of his friends who are still there are continuing that passion and that would make him very happy,” she told Here & Now.

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NPR Story
1:59 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Group Tries To Increase Access To Bicycles Among African Americans

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 6:46 am

As bike share programs kick off in cities from New York to Chattanooga, some are concerned that they only serve the yuppier parts of cities.

In Chicago, city officials acknowledged that their bike stations are focused on serving city business centers — not poorer neighborhoods.

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NPR Story
1:59 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Checking In On Chattanooga's Bike Share

(Flickr/Elly Blue)

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:47 am

Bike sharing programs are cropping up in big cities around the country: from New York to Miami to Chicago.

And Chattanooga, Tennessee has been running one of the first bike shares in a small southern city for a year.

Phil Pugliese, the bicycle coordinator for Outdoor Chattanooga, which runs the bike share, says there are unique challenges.

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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Searching For The Best BBQ In Texas

Daniel Vaughn is author of "The Prophets of Smoked Meat." (HarperCollins)

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:16 am

Ohio-born Daniel Vaughn trained as an architect in New Orleans but when he moved to Texas, he began visiting the state’s best barbecue joints.

His guide was the “bible of barbecue” — the Texas Monthly list of the 50 best BBQ joints in the world,” which comes out every five years.

He blogged about it so passionately over the past decade that in March 2013, Vaughn was named the first Barbecue Editor of the magazine.

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NPR Story
1:57 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

A Runner's View Of The Boston Marathon Bombings

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 9:32 am

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Books
1:56 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Philipp Meyer Explores Bloody Origin Of Texas In 'The Son'

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:15 am

Phllipp Meyer‘s epic new novel “The Son“ details the blood-soaked evolution of Texas.

Spanning two hundred years, it tells the story, in often brutal detail, of the McCulloughs, who first settled in the state in the early 1800s.

Patriarch Eli McCullough is kidnapped by Comanches in a brutal attack, later, his sons fall upon their Mexican neighbors with equal ferocity.

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NPR Story
1:56 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Region Reacts To Overthrow in Egypt

This citizen journalism image provided by Edlib News Network, ENN, shows anti-Syrian regime protesters holding a banner and Syrian revolution flags during a demonstration at Kafr Nabil town in Idlib province, northern Syria, Friday. (AP/Edlib News Network ENN)

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:33 am

The overthrow of Egypt’s president Mohammed Morsi has reverberated throughout the Middle East. To some it represent an attack on political Islam and for others it’s a triumph for secularism. NPR’s Peter Kenyon describes the regional reaction from his perch in Istanbul.

NPR Story
1:53 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Egypt's Islamist Leader Vows To Restore Morsi

Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi pray during the Friday prayer before a protest near the University of Cairo, Giza, Egypt, Friday. (AP)

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 2:21 pm

CAIRO – Tens of thousands of Islamists streamed across a Nile River bridge toward Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Friday, threatening a showdown moments after the top leader of the Muslim Brotherhood defiantly spoke before a cheering crowd of supporters, vowing to reinstate ousted President Mohammed Morsi and end military rule.

His fiery speech, with a military helicopter hovering overhead, came soon after army troops fired on a pro-Morsi rally and one protester was killed.

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NPR Story
7:20 am
Sat July 6, 2013

Trayvon Martin’s Mother Testifies At Zimmerman Trial

Sybrina Fulton, the mother of slain teenager Trayvon Martin, testified this morning in the ongoing trial of George Zimmerman. Zimmerman is charged with second degree murder in Martin’s death. Martin’s parents have been in the court every day of the trial.

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NPR Story
12:04 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

58 MRI's And Counting -- A Neuroscientist Maps His Own Brain

It seems like a simple question: how does the human brain change over the course of a year? It turns out, we know remarkably little about that. But one scientist at the University of Texas in Austin is trying to answer that question—and to do it, he’s had to take a pretty unusual approach — getting frequent MRI’s of his brain.

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