Here & Now

Weekdays at Noon

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f971e1c817b26f4148c2|5187f939e1c817b26f414881

Pages

NPR Story
2:35 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

New Tyler Perry Shows Offer Lessons On Finance

Promotional image for the show "The Have and Have Nots." (Oprah Winfrey Network)

Tyler Perry has two new shows on the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN): “The Have and The Have Nots” and “Love Thy Neighbor.”

At first, the shows received a record number of viewers for the network, but ratings have since dropped off.

“The Have and Have Nots” is a soap opera-like show about the tensions between rich and poor, black and white.

Read more
NPR Story
2:35 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

South Africa Marks Nelson Mandela's Birthday

Children sing to Nelson Mandela on his 95th birthday in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Jason Beaubien/Twitter)

Millions of children across South Africa sang “Happy Birthday” to Nelson Mandela today as he turns 95.

People around the world are joining South Africans in celebrating his life.

British entrepreneur Richard Branson is among those volunteering 67 minutes in their communities, to honor the 67 years Mandela gave to the struggle against apartheid and creating a new South Africa.

In New York’s Times Square, South African artist Paul Blomkamp is showing his giant portrait of Mandela, which he says was inspired by the leaders great energy.

Read more
NPR Story
2:35 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Law School Enrollment Plunges

Enrollment is declining at law schools nationwide. At Harvard (pictured) enrollment is steady, though it's becoming easier to get in. (Harvard)

Law school enrollment is taking a nose dive, and law schools are trimming their faculty rolls.

The legal market has yet to recover from the recession, and that means fewer students are applying to law school.

Middle-tier schools are among the hardest hit, and legal experts say it could be years before their enrollment returns to pre-recession levels.

Read more
NPR Story
11:55 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Netflix Makes Emmy History

Actor Kevin Spacey is pictured in a promotional image from "House of Cards." (Netflix)

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 11:31 am

Netflix’s “House of Cards” made Emmy history Thursday with a top drama series nomination, the first time that television’s leading awards have recognized a program delivered online as equal in quality to the best that TV has to offer.

The nomination, one of nine nods earned by the political thriller, is a marker in the unfolding revolution in how we get and watch video entertainment.

Read more
NPR Story
11:50 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Do Young Adults Read For Pleasure?

(mrsdkrebs/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 11:31 am

As he prepares his summer reading list, book lover and journalist Danny Heitman says he’s worried college students aren’t reading for fun anymore.

In a recent writing course he taught, he asked his students the last book they read for pleasure. Many of them hadn’t read a book for fun since “Harry Potter.”

Heitman is hesitant to offer a reading list to college-age young men and women, since lists tend to have an air of assigned reading. But he offers these 10 titles.

Read more
NPR Story
11:45 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Cleveland Hosts National Senior Games

Carlo Wolff and Fumio Yoshikawa during a break in the table tennis action. (WCPN)

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 11:31 am

As many as 10,000 athletes from across the country — ranging in age from 50 to 90 plus — are gathering in Cleveland, Ohio, to compete in the 14th National Senior Games.

The games, which get underway tomorrow and run for two weeks, include competitions in 19 sports, including cycling, swimming and track and field. There’s also badminton, bowling and Bocce ball.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, David C. Barnett of WCPN reports on a how a few of the participants are preparing for their events.

Read more
NPR Story
12:50 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Would You Let Your TV Watch You?

(espensorvik/Flickr)

A study released last week by Boston-based Strategy Analytics has revealed that, in general, Americans really don’t want their TVs watching them.

The research found that “43 percent of people would never allow a camera or sensing device to be connected to their TV.”

On the other hand, 14 percent said they’re okay with their TV viewing their behavior and their data being collected.

Read more
NPR Story
12:40 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Can Oregon Pay College Tuition Forward?

The idea for "Pay It Forward" was born out of a seminar at Portland State University. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 4:05 pm

Today the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced that federal student loan debt now tops a trillion dollars.

Many people across the country are trying to figure out a solution to that problem. One proposal from Oregon has been attracting a lot of attention.

It’s called “Pay It Forward,” and it would allow students to learn now and pay later based on a percentage of their future income.

The idea grew out of a seminar class at Portland State University.

Read more
NPR Story
12:35 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Uncertain Future For Fannie And Freddie

The Fannie Mae headquarters is seen in Washington, Monday, Aug. 8, 2011. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 4:05 pm

For the first time since the big housing crash five years ago, it appears that some lawmakers are getting serious about replacing the mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Fannie and Freddie back most of the mortgages in the country. Now, two prominent senators — one a Democrat and one a Republican — have a proposal to phase them out.

NPR’s Chris Arnold explains what this could mean for the future of the housing finance system.

Read more
NPR Story
12:06 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Al-Qaida Branch Says No. 2 Leader Killed In Yemen

This January 2009 file photo from undated video posted on a militant-leaning website, and provided by the SITE Intelligence Group, shows Saeed al-Shihri, deputy leader of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula. (SITE Intelligence Group via AP)

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 4:05 pm

The Yemen-based branch of al-Qaida says a U.S. drone strike has killed a former Guantanamo Bay prisoner who rose to become the group’s No. 2 figure.

The announcement, posted on militant websites, gives no date for the death of Saudi-born Saeed al-Shihri.

In January, Yemen’s official SABA news agency had reported that al-Shihri died of wounds from a drone strike three months earlier.

The monitoring group SITE said today that al-Shihri was eulogized in the video by a senior official in the terrorist group, known as Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula.

Read more

Pages