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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

Remembering Marion Barry

District of Columbia Mayor Marion Barry waves a fist as he arrives at U.S. District Court in Washington on Wednesday, June 28, 1990 for his trial on drug and perjury charges. (Dennis Cook/AP)

Marion Barry, the former mayor of Washington, D.C., died early yesterday morning. For more than 40 years, Barry was one of the most powerful and controversial figures in the nation’s capitol.

The four-term mayor and longtime council member was part of the generation of civil rights leaders voted onto the district’s first locally-elected government in the 1970s. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, WAMU’s Jacob Fenston has this remembrance.

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NPR Story
4:12 pm
Fri November 21, 2014

Can A Computer Compose The Music Of The Future?

Photograph of Greg Wilder (Sean Hurley/NHPR)

Yesterday on Here & Now, Derek Thompson of The Atlantic talked about how record executives make decisions about who to sign and what to play, based on data about what music people like online.

Thompson’s conclusion is that the process is making music much more bland because people like to hear music that sounds familiar.

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NPR Story
4:12 pm
Fri November 21, 2014

Rain Expected After Massive Snowfall In Buffalo

Sydney, a six year old golden retriever, makes her way through five feet of snow from a driveway on November 20, 2014 in the suburb of Lakeview, Buffalo, New York. (John Normile/Getty Images)

It has stopped snowing in the Buffalo area, but now rain in the forecast is leading to worries about possible floods and more roof collapses. Brian Meyer of WBFO in Buffalo joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with the latest.

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NPR Story
4:12 pm
Fri November 21, 2014

Country Awaits Ferguson Grand Jury Decision

Police face demonstrators protesting the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown outside the police station on November 20, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. At least three people were arrested during the protest. Brown was killed by Darren Wilson, a Ferguson police officer, on August 9. A grand jury is expected to decide this month if Wilson should be charged in the shooting. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

The country will soon know the fate of Darren Wilson, the Ferguson police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old. Tensions have been high in St. Louis County since the August shooting, which sparked violent protests and unrest.

A grand jury has been examining this case for weeks and is expected to come out with a decision on whether or not to indict Officer Wilson.

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NPR Story
1:34 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Legendary Director Mike Nichols Dies At 83

Director Mike Nichols presents the 'Lacoste Career Achievment award for Film' onstage at the 7th Annual Costume Designers Guild Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on February 19, 2005 in Beverly Hills, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 3:05 pm

Note: The audio in this story incorrectly identified the actor in a scene from “The Birdcage.” It was Luca Tommassini, not Hank Azaria. We apologize the error.

One of the most honored and successful directors in entertainment has died. Mike Nichols, director of “The Odd Couple” on Broadway, “The Graduate” on film and “Angels in America” on TV, died of a heart attack Wednesday at age 83. He once said his life as the ultimate showbiz insider came from lessons learned while growing up as an outsider.

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NPR Story
1:34 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Anger, Protests Grow Over Mexico's 43 Missing Students

A students takes part in a protest by students of the Ayotzinapa school and parents of the 43 missing students in Acapulco on November 19, 2014. A caravan of students and relatives of the missing students, feared to have been massacred, came to Acapulco as part of its journey to the Mexican capital to end November 20. (Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images)

Today is a day of protest across Mexico, and in other cities around the world, for the 43 university students missing for nearly two months.

In Mexico, the protests and the anger have been growing for days over the government’s handling of the disappearance and presumed murder of the 43 students. The protesters’ rallying cry: “Ya me canse” or “ya me canse del miedo” — I’ve had enough, I’ve had enough fear.

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NPR Story
1:34 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

NBA's First Openly Gay Player Retires

Jason Collins speaks with the media before a game between the Brooklyn Nets and Milwaukee Bucks at the Barclays Center on November 19, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Alex Goodlett/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 2:37 pm

NBA player Jason Collins became a household name last spring when he penned an essay in Sports Illustrated announcing that he was gay. Collins not only became the first openly gay player in the NBA, but also the first openly gay man in the four major American sports.

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NPR Story
1:57 pm
Wed November 19, 2014

NBC Drops New Bill Cosby Sitcom Amid Rape Allegations

NBC has reportedly canned a sitcom project in the works with Bill Cosby. The move comes as the comedian faces accusations of sexual assault and rape, and follows Netflix’ decision to shelve a Cosby stand-up special to commemorate his 77th birthday.

Model and television host Janice Dickinson is the latest woman to publicly accuse comedian Bill Cosby of sexual assault. She is one of a number of women to spark a firestorm of reaction to decades-old rape allegations against the comedian.

Cosby’s lawyer has denied the claims as “discredited allegations.”

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NPR Story
1:57 pm
Wed November 19, 2014

West Virginia’s Rivers May Be Wild, But Fewer People Know About Them

West Virginia's white water rafting industry is heavily dependent on out-of-state tourism, but the state is spending far less on advertising than its neighbors. (ben loehrke/Flickr)

The river rafting industry in West Virginia has hit some rough water. Tour companies were at the state capital in Charleston this week, asking lawmakers to spend more on the state’s advertising budget.

A state program to fund advertising has fallen from $23 million in 2004 to less than $3 million this year — just a fraction of what nearby states are spending. The rafting industry says that means potential customers in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Florida aren’t even considering West Virginia in their vacation plans.

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NPR Story
1:57 pm
Wed November 19, 2014

ISIS Advertises For Oil Industry Managers

A view of the Kawergosk Refinery, some 12 miles east of Arbil, the capital of the autonomous Kurdish region of northern Iraq, on July 14, 2014. (Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images)

The Islamic State has reportedly advertised on the black market for people to manage its oil operations, for a salary of $225,000 per year.

A consultant with Dubai-based Manaar Energy confirmed the story for the Times of London, saying that ISIS is trying to recruit skilled professionals who are “ideologically suitable.”

Western intelligence officials say that, along with ransom and extortion, oil operations have made ISIS one of the wealthiest terrorist organizations in the world. But there have been recent reports of problems at ISIS oil facilities.

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