Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
3:46 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

After 21-Year Dry Streak, Pirates Make The Playoffs

Pittsburgh Pirates center fielder Andrew McCutchen, left, Starling Marte, center and Marlon Byrd celebrate the Pirates' 2-1 win over the Chicago Cubs after a baseball game Monday, Sept. 23, 2013, in Chicago. (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)

The Pittsburgh Pirates finally snapped out of their 21-year losing streak and have clinched a spot in the playoffs.

In their game against the Chicago Cubs on Monday, the Pirates won 2-1, allowing them to advance to the playoffs, something the team hasn’t done since 1992.

Lanny Frattare experienced that day all those years ago. Frattare was the play-by-play announcer for the Pirates for 33 years.

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NPR Story
3:53 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Los Campesinos! Exclamation Point Not Optional

Los Campesinos! is a Welsh band. The band's new album is called "No Blues." (facebook.com/loscampesinos)

NPR Music’s writer and editor Stephen Thompson brings Here & Now a new song each week to jazz up our play lists.

This week it’s a song from the upcoming album from Los Campesinos!. The album is called “No Blues” and the song is “What Death Leaves Behind.”

Thompson says the punctuation in the band’s name isn’t just casual.

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NPR Story
3:53 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Michigan Prepares To Battle Invasive Asian Carp

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources uses electric probes to stun fish. (Lindsey Smith/Michigan Radio)

Asian carp, an invasive and destructive fish, have spread through the Mississippi, Ohio, Illinois and Missouri rivers. In total, the fish are affecting more than 20 states from Louisiana to South Dakota.

Under the right conditions, it could take as few as a dozen Asian carp to establish a population in the Great Lakes. That’s according to a report published this month by scientists in Ontario.

If they’re correct, the risk of even just a handful of Asian carp escaping into the Great Lakes could be more significant than officials had planned.

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NPR Story
3:53 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Elections In Germany May Shift Economic Tone In Eurozone

German chancellor Angela Merkel smiles behind German flags at the party headquarters in Berlin, Sunday, Sept. 22, 2013. (Michael Sohn/AP)

Chancellor Angela Merkel has won her third term as Germany’s top leader.

But Merkel’s center-right Christian Democrats party fell five seats short of an absolute majority in the German Bundestag — the national parliament.

This may change some economic policies in the eurozone’s largest economy, including a softening towards bailed-out nations like Greece.

Financial Times reporter Cardiff Garcia joins Here & Now to explain.

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NPR Story
3:01 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Atlanta Wedding Reception Donated To The Homeless

Carol Fowler (in blue dress) and her family donated the reception from a cancelled wedding to 200 of Atlanta's homeless. (Hosea Feed the Hungry)

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 3:21 pm

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NPR Story
3:01 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Verdict In Trial Of Bo Xilai Due This Weekend

In this Aug. 22, 2013 file photo released by the Jinan Intermediate People's Court, former Politburo member and Chongqing city party leader Bo Xilai, center, stands on trial at the court in eastern China's Shandong province. A verdict is expected on Sept. 22. (Jinan Intermediate People's Court via AP)

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 3:21 pm

China’s biggest political scandal in decades reaches a conclusion this weekend.

A verdict is due in the trial of Bo Xilai, one of China’s rising political stars. He’s accused of corruption and covering up the murder of the British businessman Neil Heywood.

Bo’s wife has already been found guilty of poisoning Heywood, with whom she had a business dispute. Bo remains a popular figure.

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NPR Story
3:01 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

13 Injured In Chicago Park Shooting

Chicago Police detectives investigate the scene where a number of people, including a 3-year-old child, were shot in a city park on the south side of Chicago, Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. (Paul Beaty/AP)

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 3:21 pm

Thirteen people were wounded in a shooting in Chicago late Thursday night, including a 3-year-old boy.

The shooting took place in the Back of the Yards neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago.

Police are still interviewing victims to determine a motive for the shooting, but a police spokesman said it appeared to be gang-related.

Chicago had more than 500 homicides in 2012, more than any other city in the United States.

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NPR Story
3:33 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Play Illuminates Rocky Year In Johnson Presidency

Bryan Cranston is pictured in "All the Way." (Evgenia Eliseeva/American Repertory Theater)

Bill Rauch graduated from Harvard University in 1984 and co-founded the Cornerstone Theater Company, which made a point of bringing theater to underserved places.

He’s since moved on to become artistic director of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Now, he returns to Cambridge, Mass. to direct “All the Way” at the American Repertory Theater.

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NPR Story
3:33 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Revisiting The Fire That Killed 19 Hotshots

Unidentified members of the Granite Mountain Interagency Hotshot Crew from Prescott, Ariz., pose together in this undated photo provided by the City of Prescott. Some of the men in this photograph were among the 19 firefighters killed while battling an out-of-control wildfire near Yarnell, Ariz., on Sunday, June 30, 2013, according to Prescott Fire Chief Dan Fraijo. It was the nation's biggest loss of firefighters in a wildfire in 80 years. (City of Prescott, Ariz.)

The Yarnell Hill fire that swept through Arizona in late June and early July burned more than 8,000 acres, destroyed 129 buildings and killed 19 firefighters — members of the Granite Mountain Hotshot crew from nearby Prescott, Ariz.

An independent investigative team has been looking at whether or not human error contributed to the deaths of almost the entire team. Their findings are expected out in the next few weeks.

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NPR Story
3:33 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

SEC Wants Companies To Disclose CEO-Worker Pay Ratio

The Securities and Exchange Commission's Washington DC headquarters. (Wikimedia Commons)

The Securities and Exchange Commission has proposed a rule that would require publicly traded companies to disclose the difference in pay between the company’s CEO and its employees.

The rule is applauded by unions and labor advocacy groups that think the transparency would help investors “identify top heavy compensation models,” according to Reuters. However, business groups oppose the measure.

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