Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
2:49 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Singer Ledisi On 'Selma' And 'Intimate Truth'

Ledisi performs at The Epitome of Soul Award honoring Stevie Wonder on October 11, 2014 in Memphis, Tennessee. (Greg Campbell/Getty Images)

R&B and jazz singer Ledisi portrayed gospel legend Mahalia Jackson in the movie “Selma.” In the film, she comforts an anxious Martin Luther King Jr. with an arresting version of “Take My Hand, Precious Lord.” Ledisi has been out on tour for her new album, “The Intimate Truth,” and speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
2:49 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Cuba Eyes Economic Gain With Thaw In U.S. Relations

Cuba's President Raul Castro speaks during a meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama on the sidelines of the Summit of the Americas at the ATLAPA Convention center on April 11, 2015 in Panama City. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President Barack Obama and Cuban leader Raul Castro made history this weekend when they sat down together in Panama.

The men were attending the Summit of the Americas. It was the first time the United States attended the summit since it began in the 1990s.

Obama stressed the economic benefits that thawed U.S.-Cuban relations would bring to both countries, but the president did not announce that Cuba would be removed from the U.S. State Sponsors of Terrorism list.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Deadly Fashion: Norwegian Bloggers Experience Life In A Sweatshop

In the show “Sweatshop,” several Norwegian fashion bloggers flew to Cambodia, where they lived and worked in the clothing industry.

The three fashionistas – Frida, Ludwig and Anniken – not only saw, but experienced the hardships of Cambodian clothing workers, including low pay, terrible working conditions and sleeping on a cold, hard floor.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Malcolm Gladwell Wrestles With David And Goliath Stories

Author Malcolm Gladwell is known for taking an alternate tack to conventional thinking, in books like “The Tipping Point” and “Outliers.”

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Street Art Meets Ballet In Miami

Heatscape by Justin Peck.

At the Miami City Ballet tonight, the dancers are sharing the stage with a backdrop that includes the face of wrestler Andre the Giant.

That’s what happens when one of the country’s most sought-after choreographers teams up with one the country’s most famous street artists.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Alicia Zuckerman of WLRN reports.

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

As Price Of Oil Falls, Drilling Rigs In Colorado Feel The Pinch

A disassembled rig sits in a field east of Greeley, Colo. (Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio)

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 11:25 am

Half of Colorado’s drill rigs have gone idle since the end of October. The decline in the oil economy’s growth here is directly tied to the low price of oil. Economic experts aren’t sure where prices are headed, and that translates into economic uncertainty and layoffs. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Grace Hood of Colorado Public Radio reports.

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

'Forget It, Jake, It's Chinatown': California's Historic Drought Has Cinematic Feel

Jack Nicholson portrays a private investigator in Los Angeles in the 1930's, endangered when a seemingly routine case uncovers the private scandals of the city's leading family, in "Chinatown." 1974 photo. (CBS Television Network via AP)

The photos and stories of California’s historic drought seem cinematic because they are. The 1974 film “Chinatown” involves a fictional Los Angeles mayor making the case for building an aqueduct to bring water from farm areas to Los Angeles, to supply water for people to move to the city.

Kevin Starr, history professor at the University of Southern California, says comparing the present-day drought to the California of “Chinatown” is especially apt.

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

7 Out Of 10 Americans Worried About Finances

(TradingAcademy.com/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 9:23 pm

New surveys out this month suggest Americans still don't understand the value of saving. Millennials are not saving, primarily because of student debt and low wages.

But it's not just young people. The National Foundation for Credit Counseling released a survey showing seven in 10 Americans still say they are consistently worried about their finances.

There is evidence that Americans have gotten better at managing credit card debt, but bottom line, the survey finds people are not getting their finances in good order.

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NPR Story
2:32 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Tsarnaev Convicted On All Charges In Marathon Bombing

A jury has convicted Dzhokhar Tsarnaev of all 30 counts he faced stemming from the 2013 bombing of the Boston Marathon.

Tsarnaev was found guilty Wednesday on charges that included conspiracy and use of a weapon of mass destruction. Of the 30 charges, 17 are punishable by death.

Tsarnaev’s lawyers admitted he participated in the bombings, but said his now-dead older brother was the driving force behind the deadly attack.

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NPR Story
2:32 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Police Chief 'Sickened' By S.C. Shooting Video

Anthony Scott holds a photo of himself, center, and his brothers Walter Scott, left, and Rodney Scott, right, as he talks about his brother at his home near North Charleston, S.C., Wednesday, April 8, 2015. Walter Scott was killed by a North Charleston police officer after a traffic stop on Saturday. The officer, Michael Thomas Slager, has been charged with murder. (Chuck Burton/AP)

A white South Carolina police officer who claimed he killed a black man in self-defense has been fired and faces murder charges after a bystander’s video recorded him firing eight shots at the man’s back as he ran away. The city’s mayor also said he’s ordered body cameras to be worn by every single officer on the force.

The officer, Michael Thomas Slager, has been fired, but the town will continue to pay for his health insurance because his wife is eight months pregnant, said North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey, who called it a tragedy for two families.

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