Here & Now

Weekdays at Noon

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f971e1c817b26f4148c2|5187f939e1c817b26f414881

Pages

NPR Story
3:17 pm
Fri May 1, 2015

Former Chris Christie Ally Pleads Guilty In 'Bridgegate' Case

David Wildstein, former Port Authority appointee of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, leaves the Federal Court on May 01, 2015 in Newark. Wildstein pleaded guilty on charges after a federal probe into the George Washington Bridge Case. (Kena Betancur/Getty Images)

David Wildstein, a former Port Authority official in New Jersey, pleaded guilty today to playing a role in shutting down lanes of traffic during rush hour on the George Washington Bridge, a move taken as political retribution against the Mayor of Fort Lee, New Jersey, who refused to support New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s bid for re-election.

Wildstein was a known Christie ally, as well as one of the governor’s childhood friends.

Read more
NPR Story
3:17 pm
Fri May 1, 2015

Lincoln History Told Through Tree Rings

Arborist Guy Sternberg points to the rings on the cross section of the oak tree that shaded the funeral choir at Oak Ridge Cemetery when Abraham Lincoln’s body arrived in Springfield in 1865. (Peter O'Dowd)

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 9:20 am

In 1992, the Lincoln Vault Oak was cut down to protect Abraham Lincoln’s burial vault.

At the president’s funeral in 1865, the tree stood just a few feet from the event, shading the funeral choir.

When the tree was finally cut down, local arborist Guy Sternberg salvaged the massive stump and began a dissection project that peeled back the layers of history to reveal clues about that day.

Sternberg speaks with Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd about what he was able to learn.

 

Read more
NPR Story
3:17 pm
Fri May 1, 2015

Grooveshark Shuts Down After Battle With Music Industry

(danilobe/Flickr)

The free music streaming service Grooveshark has closed down its service after a six-year legal battle with the music industry.

The closure of the service, owned by Escape Media, is part of a settlement with Universal Music Group, Sony Music and Warner Music Group, in which the company issued a formal apology in lieu of paying damages to the labels.

Read more
NPR Story
2:03 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Aid Worker In Nepal Says Drones Might Help Survey Remote Areas

Nepalese villagers wait for relief aid from an Indian Army helicopter at Uiya village, in northern-central Gorkha district on April 29, 2015. Hungry and desperate villagers rushed towards relief helicopters in remote areas of Nepal, begging to be airlifted to safety, four days after an earthquake killed more than 5,000 people. (Saijad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images)

The death toll in Nepal continues to climb after a devastating earthquake over the weekend. Sean Casey, an aid worker with the International Medical Corps, joins Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins from Kathmandu to discuss the response methods.

Casey says his organization is exploring the use of drones to get a view of how remote villages were affected by the earthquake. Access to many of those villages has been hampered by the damage from the earthquake.

Read more
NPR Story
2:03 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Archaeologists Dig Deep At George Washington's Boyhood Home

Stones mark the corners of George Washington's boyhood home, discovered by George Washington Foundation archaeologists in 2008. The Rappahannock River flows in the distance. (Courtesy of the George Washington Foundation)

When people think of George Washington’s home, Mount Vernon, Va., usually comes to mind – but that’s just where he lived later in life. Our first president spent most of his childhood at Ferry Farm in Fredericksburg, Va.

The house itself has long since been destroyed, but after years of excavation, archaeologists have found its exact location, along with hundreds of thousands of artifacts. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Matthew Schwartz of WAMU went there to hear the tale.

Read more
NPR Story
2:03 pm
Thu April 30, 2015

Lincoln's Legacy Inspires Greek Family Business In Decatur

The Lincoln Square Lounge in Decatur, Ill. (Peter O'Dowd)

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 8:15 am

When President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train left Indianapolis on May 1, 1865, it turned north to Chicago. But Here & Now’s series Tracking Lincoln is going due west to Decatur, Illinois.

Lincoln lived near Decatur long before he became president. It’s said that he made his first public speech right there in the center of town, where a statue of the young president-to-be now stands.

Read more
NPR Story
1:27 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

A Short History Of The Public Radio Tote Bag

(NPR.org)

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 2:50 pm

Adrienne LaFrance speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young about the history of the public radio tote bag, and why it’s become so identified with NPR and fundraising.

While tote bags may be the most associated with public radio fundraising, NPR does have an array of merchandise people can get for their support.

Read more
NPR Story
1:27 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Placebo Effect: It Might Not Be In Your Head After All

(v1ctor/Flickr)

The “placebo effect” is the idea that a pill or treatment with no medicinal ingredient can help or cure a person because he or she believes it will — that the idea of treatment can be as important as treatment itself.

The clinical research into placebos goes back to 1978, when researchers found that some dental patients got as much relief from a placebo pill as others did from a narcotic painkiller.

Read more
NPR Story
1:27 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Japanese Prime Minister Calls For Stronger U.S.-Japan Trade Pact

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe addresses a joint session of Congress at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on April 29, 2015, as U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (left) and House Speaker John Boehner listen. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

On Wednesday, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe addressed a joint meeting of the House and Senate. He urged them to strengthen economic and trade ties between the U.S. and Japan while talking up a trade deal known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership or TPP.

U.S. lawmakers are divided over the idea of supporting broader trade with Japan. Democrats especially want to protect the American car market, while Japan is looking for the U.S. to remove obstacles to Japanese car and part imports.

Read more
NPR Story
1:33 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Indianapolis: Tensions Stir As Murder Rate Surges

Indianapolis Police Chief Rick Hite blames the murders on the same kind of drug crimes that New York and other major cities went through in the 1980s. (Peter O'Dowd)

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 8:19 am

Police in Indianapolis are struggling to contain a surge in murders. Last year police counted 138 homicides – a 44 percent jump from 2012.

Patrol Officer Lona Douglas works on the city’s west side in one of six neighborhoods designated as a high-crime area. On a recent afternoon, I was with her as she responded to a potential burglary.

Read more

Pages