Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
3:17 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Ice Fishing A Stone's Throw From Downtown Milwaukee

The trip to Milwaukee's new bay is a quick one for three north shore ice fishermen. (Marge Pitrof/WUWM)

While frigid temperatures are a hardship for some, they’re a blessing for ice fishermen. Marge Pitrof from Here & Now contributor station WUWM met up with some on a small bay in Lake Michigan, a stone’s throw from downtown Milwaukee.

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NPR Story
3:20 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

DJ Sessions: From Sam Smith To Takuya Kuroda

Disclosure, an English electronic music duo, is among the bands KCRW DJ Anthony Valadez recommends. (disclosureofficial.com)

KCRW DJ Anthony Valadez joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with some new music — from a new version of the song “Latch” with British artist Sam Smith, to a song that caught his attention from the soundtrack of “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.”

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NPR Story
3:16 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Will Sochi Olympics Architecture Win Gold?

Fisht Olympic Stadium is pictured in the new Sochi Olympic Park. (Courtesy of Populous)

The Olympics start today, and one thing viewers are excited to see that isn’t an event is the architecture of the facilities. At a price tag of $50 billion, they are the most expensive games in history. The president of the Sochi chapter of the Union of Russian Architects says the city has been transformed.

This is the first Winter Games designed as part of a master plan, but with stories of two toilets in a stall, and facilities for previous Olympics around the world going unused, what will be the legacy of the buildings at Sochi?

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NPR Story
3:16 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Stolen Stradivarius Possibly Recovered

In this undated photo provided by the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, concertmaster Frank Almond plays a 300-year-old Stradivarius violin that was on loan to him during a concert in Milwaukee. (Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra via AP)

A Milwaukee County assistant district attorney says three people have been arrested in connection with the theft of a multi-million dollar Stradivarius violin stolen last week from the concertmaster of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra.

Police say that the investigation is ongoing and it’s not yet clear whether the violin was recovered. Experts are asked to determine whether the violin recovered is authentic.

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NPR Story
4:16 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

To Close Or Not to Close Highways In A Winter Storm

Cars travel down a highway during a snowstorm in the Brooklyn borough on February 3, 2014 in New York City. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Forecasters are calling it Nika – the latest major winter storm, now dumping snow on Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New England. In New York, ice spurred Governor Cuomo to take the major step of closing I-84, the highway that runs from Pennsylvania to Massachusetts.

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NPR Story
4:16 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Stock Market Volatility Jumps In 2014

The Chicago Board of Options Exchange’s Volatility Index (VIX) has been tracking the speed of stock price movements since 1990. In January, the index showed that volatility – or the fluctuation of share prices – jumped 34 percent.

This is the largest increase in VIX history and possibly indicates that investors are getting surprised and changing their investment decisions. NPR’s Marilyn Geewax joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss “volatility” and what this increase says about the market in 2014.

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NPR Story
4:16 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Concerns Over Brazil’s Readiness For World Cup And Summer Olympics

The Arena Pantanal stadium is under construction ahead of the 2014 World Cup soccer tournament in Cuiaba, Brazil, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013. FIFA wants all World Cup stadiums completed by December. (Felipe Dana/AP)

With the 2014 Winter Olympic Games kicking off this week in Sochi, it may seem excessive to look ahead to the 2016 Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro. However, Brazilian officials are already under significant pressure for not meeting deadlines in planning the 2016 Olympic Games and the 2014 World Cup.

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NPR Story
4:01 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

'Jeopardy Villain' Explains How He Keeps Winning

Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek and contestant Arthur Chu pose for a photo. (Facebook)

He’s being called the “Jeopardy villain,” but Arthur Chu of Broadview Heights, Ohio, considers himself more of a “mad genius.” The 30-year-old insurance analyst and voiceover artist has won three times since he came on the show last week.

Some say Chu is taking all the fun out of the game. He goes for the hardest questions first, slams down his buzzer incessantly and tries to get the host to speed up. It’s all part of his strategy inspired by game theory — a model of strategic, mathematical decision making.

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NPR Story
4:01 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

Behind The Ups And Downs On Wall Street

U.S. stocks opened slightly higher today after the Dow Jones plunged more than 320 points yesterday — the worst day in more than seven months. The S&P 500 also inched up at the open, after ending yesterday down nearly 6 percent from a recent high.

So what’s up with the ups and downs? Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the drop and whether it will continue.

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NPR Story
4:01 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

What Airline Hub Closures Mean For Communities

A United Airlines sits on the tarmac at San Francisco International Airport on January 23, 2014 in San Francisco, California. United Airlines parent company United Continental Holdings reported a surge in fourth quarter profits with earnings of $140 million compared to a loss of $620 million one year ago. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

This weekend, United Airlines announced it was cutting roughly 60 percent of its departures from Cleveland, beginning this spring. The move effectively eliminates United’s hub at the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport.

Yesterday, city officials gave their official response to the news, doing their best to put a positive spin on it. We hear a report from Brian Bull of WCPN, a Here & Now contributor station.

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