Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
3:18 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

In Prison With Nelson Mandela

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:58 am

Anti-apartheid activist Ahmed Kathrada spent almost 27 years in prison with Nelson Mandela on Robben Island. Earlier this year, he gave President and Michelle Obama a tour of his former prison.

Here & Now’s Robin Young spoke to Kathrada in July. Today we present an excerpt of that conversation.

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NPR Story
3:18 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

Fukushima Inspectors Say Beginning Of Clean-Up Going Well So Far

In this photo released Nov. 27, 2013, by International Atomic Energy Agency, a team of IAEA experts check out water storage tanks at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Japan. (Greg Webb/IAEA)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:58 am

Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency are praising Japan for making progress to stabilize the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, which was crippled by an earthquake and tsunami nearly three years ago.

This week, the IAEA inspectors wrapped up a 10-day inspection of the plant, where the decommissioning process started a few weeks ago.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson gets the latest from BBC Tokyo correspondent Rupert Wingfield-Hayes.

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NPR Story
3:18 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

Budget Deal May Be On The Horizon

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:58 am

Congressional budget committee leaders are working to pull together a budget deal by the end of next week. Republic Congressman Paul Ryan and Democratic Senator Patty Murray are reportedly discussing how to increase revenue without raising taxes.

A main provision of the agreement would be a partial easing of the next two spending sequesters. It was only in October that a deadlock over federal spending led to the first government shutdown in 17 years.

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NPR Story
4:22 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

A Cappella Fans Cheer Return Of 'The Sing-Off'

The panel of judges on NBC's "The Sing-Off," an a cappella competition. (NBC)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:00 am

On Monday, NBC’s a cappella competition “The Sing-Off” returns for a fourth season on Monday, Dec. 9.

Ten teams (list below) will compete for a recording contract and a $100,000 prize.

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NPR Story
3:18 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Illinois Pension Debate Expected To Move To Courts

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:00 am

Update 3:20 p.m.: Illinois Governor Pat Quinn has signed the pension reform bill.

Now that lawmakers have passed an overhaul of Illinois’s government worker pension systems, the fight is expected to move to the courts.

Provisions of the overhaul include raising the retirement age for many state workers and cutting some benefits. The overhaul is estimated to save the state $160 billion over 30 years.

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn is expected to sign the bill by the end of the week.

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NPR Story
3:18 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

China Mobile And Apple Sign iPhone Deal

China Mobile, the world's largest mobile carrier, will soon provide iPhone service on its network. (William Hook/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:00 am

The world’s largest mobile carrier, China Mobile, will soon offer iPhones on its network.

The deal gives Apple access to more than 700 million subscribers. That’s seven times the size of Verizon Wireless.

Derek Thompson, business editor for The Atlantic, joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the implications of the deal.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Miami Gears Up For Art Basel

Street artist Komik in front of his piece. (Julia Duba/WLRN)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:03 am

Every year, tens of thousands of people attend the international art show in Miami Beach called Art Basel. There are arts galleries, live music performances and lots of live street exhibitions on the street.

Art Basel, which runs from Dec. 5 to 8, also comes to Miami’s up-and-coming neighborhood, Wynwood. With its warehouses-turned-art galleries, Wynwood is a prime location for street art.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

NPR's Planet Money Follows The Life Of A T-Shirt

Lisa, 30, is one of many people who bought the shirt and posted a photo of herself wearing it on Instagram.

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:03 am

If you’ve been listening to NPR this week, you’ve probably heard about something called the t-shirt project.

Months ago, Planet Money had the idea to design a t-shirt and follow it around the world as it was manufactured.

The project took the Planet Money team around the globe: from factories in Bangladesh and Colombia, to cotton farms and container ships.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

New Bombs Pose New Threat

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:04 am

With top U.S. lawmakers warning of new terrorism threats, intelligence officials in the U.K. say there remains an enduring threat from bombs made by terrorists in Yemen.

The threat comes from the type of bomb that failed to explode on a plane over Detroit in 2009 — the so-called underwear bomber.

The BBC’s security correspondent Frank Gardner reports.

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NPR Story
3:20 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Harvard Professor Gives Two Sets Of Marks To Combat Grade Inflation

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:05 am

Harvard University is back in the news for questions over grade inflation. A Harvard professor and longtime critic of grade inflation discovered yesterday that the most frequent mark given at the university is a perfect A.

Harvard government professor Harvey Mansfield has long been a critic of grade inflation. He’s developed his own way of trying to combat it: giving students two sets of grades — the one they deserve and the one that shows up on their transcript.

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