Here & Now

Weekdays at Noon

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

The British election is Thursday, and while Prime Minister Theresa May is still ahead in the polls, support for Labour Party candidate Jeremy Corbyn has grown more than expected.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with Mike Katz (@mikekatz), the Labour Party parliamentary candidate for the London suburb of Hendon.

Since the middle of the last century more than 90 percent of Isle de Jean Charles has dissolved into the southern Louisiana bayou.

The island, which is connected to the outside world by a road that’s known to flood in perfect weather, is home to a tribe of Native Americans who have fished and hunted there since the 1800s.

Those who remain are barely clinging to what’s left.

The film “Wonder Woman” took in over $100 million at the box office in its first weekend, the biggest opening ever for a female director.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with historian Jill Lepore, author of “The Secret History of Wonder Woman,” about the evolution of the comic book character and Wonder Woman’s connection to feminism.

The start of the summer TV season means the return of audience favorites, plus dozens of series premieres. Networks are experimenting with reality competitions and comedies along with a new generation of game shows.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans (@Deggans) joins Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd with more on what to expect from this summer’s lineup.

“I, Daniel Blake” won the top prize at last year’s Cannes Film Festival. On Friday, the gut-wrenching film about the struggles of living under England’s welfare system opens in U.S. theaters.

Howie Movshovitz (@HowieMovshovitz) of member station KUNC reports that it’s the latest from one of Britain’s greatest living filmmakers, Ken Loach.

The new Netflix movie “War Machine” features Brad Pitt as an American general commanding allied forces in Afghanistan. The film is a fictionalized account of the downfall of a real U.S. general, Stanley McChrystal, who was relieved of duty by President Obama after a less-than-flattering profile in Rolling Stone.

Locals put the crisis into a perspective that’s easy to understand.

Louisiana loses a football field of land every hour of the day.

“Even my customers are starting to recognize it now,” says charter boat captain Ripp Blank. “And it don’t come back once it leaves.”

Blank has been fishing the waters around Bayou Barataria — 30 miles or so north of the Gulf of Mexico — his entire life. If you’re a newcomer, it can be hard to discern where the water ends and the land begins.

There are reports that President Trump has decided to withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change. Wednesday morning, he tweeted that he will make a formal announcement this week.

A new oral history project at California’s Fresno State is documenting the roots of the hip-hop dance craze known as popping.

Alice Daniel from Here & Now contributor KQED has our story.

In the mid-1800s over half a million Americans migrated west in covered wagons along the Oregon Trail. They were searching for riches, claiming land and fleeing religious persecution.

But no one had authentically crossed the trail in a wagon in over a century — until Rinker Buck. Jakob Lewis of Here & Now contributor WPLN shares Buck’s story of facing the uncertainty of adventure, and the fleeting nature of arriving.

Pages