Here & Now

Weekdays at Noon

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f971e1c817b26f4148c2|5187f939e1c817b26f414881

Pages

NPR Story
3:30 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

Composer Caroline Shaw Nominated For Grammy

Violinist, singer and composer Caroline Shaw is the youngest person ever to win a Pulitzer Prize for music.

Her voice bending piece “Partita For 8 Voices” captured the attention of the Pulitzer judges this spring.

And she has been nominated for a Grammy award in the Best Contemporary Classical Composition category, also for “Partita For 8 Voices.”

Read more
NPR Story
3:30 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

New Mayor Vows To Outlaw A Central Park Tradition

A horse-drawn carriage is seen near Central Park January 2, 2014 in New York. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has announced he would like the city council to outlaw the horse-drawn carriages and have them replaced by electric antique cars. (Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

The horse drawn carriages are a staple in New York’s Central Park and an almost mandatory destination for the hoards of tourists that visit the city each year.

They have been around for more than 150 years–ever since Central Park first opened in 1858.

But this year, New York’s new mayor Bill DeBlasio is vowing to do away with Central Park’s horse drawn carriages.

He says that the practice is cruel and essentially amounts to animal abuse.

DeBlasio says doing away with this NY tradition will be one of the first changes he makes in office.

Read more
NPR Story
3:30 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

Snowy Owls Head South In Biggest Numbers In 50 Years

Perched upon a car tire in a clam flat at Long Wharf in New Haven on December 15, 2013, a young male Snowy Owl scans its surroundings. In the background is Five Mile Point light in New Haven harbor. (Matt Messina/WNPR)

Birders in the Northeast are enjoying a rare spectacle this winter: sightings of the snowy owl.

Low supplies of food in the birds’ usual habitat — the Arctic — have sent some snowy owls south in search of prey, and they are sparking the imaginations of those who get a glimpse of the rare bird.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Patrick Skahill of WNPR went searching for snowy owls along the Connecticut coast.

Read more
NPR Story
1:56 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Antarctic Explorer's Failure Becomes His Greatest Success

Recently recovered cellulose photos recovered by the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust. Pictured, Iceberg and land, Ross Island. (New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust)

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 4:14 pm

A helicopter has rescued all 52 passengers from a research ship that’s been trapped in Antarctic ice since Christmas Eve.

The group was stuck in the ice for 10 days, but imagine being stuck there for 15 months – with no communication with the outside world.

That’s what happened to Irish explorer Ernest Shackleton and his team in their attempt to make a land crossing of Antarctica in 1914.

Their ship got stuck in the ice, and they never reached their goal. But that journey is now remembered for Shackleton’s journey to rescue his crew.

Read more
NPR Story
1:55 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Bringing Back Detroit's 'Jit' Dance

The Jit is a street dance that was developed in Detroit during the 1970s. Haleem Rasul is the founder of HardCore Detroit, a dance troupe, and is keeping the dance's legacy alive in a new documentary. (Courtesy Haleem Rasul)

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 7:01 pm

Detroit is known for its auto industry, Motown music and now bankruptcy and vacant buildings — but a group of young dancers wants the city’s legacy also to include a street dance, known as the “Jit” (not to be confused with the swing dance called the jitterbug from the 1930s).

Three brothers started the dance in Detroit in the 1970s, they became known as the “Jitterbugs,” doing flips and kicks alongside each other in coordinated routines.

Read more
NPR Story
1:55 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

European Union Eases Work Restrictions

People prepare to board a bus to London via Germany and France on January 2, 2014 at the central bus station in Sofia. Romanians and Bulgarians have the right to work in any of the European Union's 28 countries, but 'no major increase' in emigration is expected, the European Commission has said. (Nikolay Doychinov/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 4:14 pm

Citizens of Romania and Bulgaria can now work without restrictions across the European Union.

The two countries are the poorest in the EU and their citizens’ rights to work and claim benefits were limited for the first seven years of their EU membership.

Some in the wealthier countries fear that because those restrictions have been eased, there may be mass migration from Romania and Bulgaria into wealthier member nations.

Read more
NPR Story
2:46 pm
Wed January 1, 2014

The Year In Jazz

Cecile McLorin Salvant is one of jazz critic Francis Davis' picks for best jazz of 2013. (cecilemclorinsalvant.com)

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 4:14 pm

For the past eight years, jazz critic Francis Davis polls his fellow critics on the best jazz records of the year.

Davis joins  Here & Now’s Robin Young to share the best jazz music that came out of 2013. Davis also takes a look back at some of jazz’s biggest losses from the year — from Marian McPartland to Jim Hall and Yusef Lateef.

Read more
NPR Story
2:46 pm
Wed January 1, 2014

Economists Predict Good Cheer For The New Year

Confetti falls throughout Times Square during the New Years Eve celebration on January 1, 2014 in New York City. Economists are also among those who are optimistic for the new year. (Christopher Gregory/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 4:14 pm

As the new year begins, most economists’ annual forecasts are brimming with good cheer.

Just one example: Goldman Sachs’ forecasters wrote, “The economic news remains broadly encouraging.”

And stock analysts are upbeat about the outlook for Wall Street.

At JPMorgan, they said the country is in the midst of “a classic bull market” that is not done running yet.

NPR’s Marily Geewax joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss the data behind the optimism.

Read more
NPR Story
2:46 pm
Wed January 1, 2014

Airport Chaplains Minister To The Transient

Senior Chaplain D.D. Hayes of the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport's interfaith chaplaincy performs a wedding ceremony. (dfwairportchapel.org)

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 4:14 pm

Their congregations are diverse and transient. Some have scheduled religious services but often, ministering happens in the hallways.

They are airport chaplains, and sometimes, they’re busier than TSA agents.

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with two chaplains, Bishop D.D. Hayes at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, and Rev. Chris Piasta, at John F. Kennedy Airport’s Our Lady of the Skies.

Read more
NPR Story
2:06 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

'Born To Run': What Makes A Great Song?

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 4:15 pm

An early draft of Bruce Springsteen’s lyrics for his first big hit song “Born to Run” sold for $197,000 at auction earlier this month.

The song was written in 1974 at a time when Springsteen was under pressure to produce a hit or get dropped from his record label.

Read more

Pages