Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
1:44 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Long-Term Unemployed Face Tough Odds Of Getting New Jobs

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:45 pm

The Labor Department releases March jobs numbers tomorrow. Economists expect relatively good news with payrolls expected to rise by 200,000 in March.

But the outlook for the long-term unemployed is still murky. A recent Brookings Institution paper found that only 11 percent of the long-term unemployed find work again a year later.

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NPR Story
1:44 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Don't Try This At Home: Whales Set New Breath-Hold Record

Satellite tag being attached to the dorsal fin of a Cuvier's beaked whale. The tagging arrow can be seen in the air as it detaches from the tag. (Erin Falcone/Cascadia Research under NOAA permit 16111)

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:45 pm

Researchers have documented a new breath hold record among mammals. They timed a dive by a whale off the coast of California that lasted two hours and 17 minutes.

To gather the initial results, which were published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS One, the researchers used barbed darts to attach temporary dive recorders to the dorsal fins of eight whales. The satellite-linked tags were made by a Redmond, Washington company, Wildlife Computers.

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Here & Now
1:40 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

AP: U.S. Agency Created 'Cuban Twitter' To Stir Political Unrest

Students gather behind a business looking for a Internet signal for their smart phones in Havana, Cuba, on April 1. The U.S. Agency for International Development masterminded the creation of a "Cuban Twitter," a communications network designed to undermine the communist government in Cuba, built with secret shell companies and financed through foreign banks, The Associated Press has learned. (Ramon Espinosa/AP Photo)

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:45 pm

An Associated Press investigation released today reveals that the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) created a Twitter-like company in Cuba. The goal was to undermine the Cuban government by giving disgruntled citizens the tools to more easily organize and communicate.

The company, called Zunzuneo, gradually grew to include more than 40,000 Cuban subscribers who had no idea their messages were being monitored and their personal data was being gathered by the U.S. government.

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Here & Now
5:06 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Deadline For ATMs Approaching As Microsoft Ends XP Support

(ThinkPanama.com/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 1:51 pm

On April 8th, Microsoft is ending tech support for Windows XP. That means banks and some private vendors are under pressure to upgrade their ATMs or their systems may be more vulnerable.

Ninety-five percent of the world’s ATMs run Windows XP and upgrading is an expensive proposition. It not only entails changing the operating system but adding new hardware on each ATM, too.

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Science & Health
4:58 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Why The Doctor's Always Late

Dr. Gearhart and Catrena Drake update the day's appointments, marking which patients have arrived and which patients are still waiting to be seen. (Lindsay Lazarski/WHYY)

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 1:51 pm

Patients wait an average of about 20 minutes at doctors’ offices, according to national data from healthcare consultants. It’s a major annoyance for patients who are stuck leafing through dated magazines, and worrying about work piling up on their desks.

What’s the hold-up? What’s happening behind that waiting room door?

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Cass Sunstein On Conspiracy Theories

Cass Sunstein is pictured in the White House in March 2011, when he was Director of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the Office of Management and Budget. (AP)

Harvard law professor Cass Sunstein says pick your topic — the tragic disappearance of the Malaysian plane, Ukraine, the NSA, the economic crisis, even the authorship of Shakespeare’s plays — and you can find a conspiracy theory.

Sunstein himself has faced hate mail and threats after his time in the Obama White House, and for his articles on topics such as FDR and the rights of animals. Glenn Beck repeatedly described him as “the most dangerous man in America.”

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Embattled D.C. Mayor Concedes In Primary

Last night, Muriel Bowser, Democratic mayoral candidate in Washington, D.C., won the primary election positioning her to be the next mayor of the nation’s capital.

The election took a dramatic twist three weeks ago when federal prosecutors alleged that the current Mayor Vincent Gray was aware of an illegal $680,000 slush fund that aided his 2010 mayoral campaign.

Patrick Madden, city hall reporter for WAMU, joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Acceptance Letters In Hand, Students Wonder How To Pay

(silversnake852/Flickr)

It’s that time of year again — when college acceptance (and rejection) letters find their way into the hands of nervous high school seniors. But that’s the easy part. Exponentially more complicated is figuring out how to pay.

The average cost of four-year-private college in 2013 was $30,094. The sticker price at in-state public colleges is close to $9,000 or $22,000, if you’re coming from out of state. And those jaw-dropping estimates don’t include room and board, books or even an apple to give the teacher.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Legendary House Music Producer Frankie Knuckles Dies At 59

DJ Frankie Knuckles plays at the Def Mix 20th Anniversary Weekender at Turnmills nightclub on May 6, 2007 in London, England. (Claire Greenway/Getty Images)

Fans of house music are mourning the loss today of legendary producer Frankie Knuckles, who died unexpectedly yesterday at age 59. He was considered the “godfather of house music.” That’s a style that started in Chicago in the late 1970s.

Knuckles founded his own club in Chicago called The Power Plant, where he would remix artists like Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston and Luther Vandros. One of his most iconic clubs songs is “Waiting on My Angel” with artist Jamie Principle.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Deadly Ebola Outbreak In Guinea Is Spreading

Staff of the 'Doctors without Borders' ('Medecin sans frontieres') medical aid organisation carry the body of a person killed by viral hemorrhagic fever, at a center for victims of the Ebola virus in Guekedou, on April 1, 2014. (Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images)

The Ebola virus has broken out across Guinea and has reportedly spread to other countries in West Africa.

Already more than 80 people have been killed from the hemorrhagic fever which has no vaccine or treatment.

The Zaire Strain of the virus is reportedly contracted from animal to human contact with bats, primates, rodents and some antelopes.

Neighboring country Senegal has closed its borders to Guinea in hopes of keeping the virus out.

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