Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Marking The 50th Anniversary Of The Civil Rights Act

This week, U.S. presidents are heading to Austin, Texas, to commemorate the 50-year anniversary of the the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Former presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush are all scheduled to speak in addition to President Obama at the Civil Rights Summit at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

DJ Sessions: 'Vibey' And Melodic With Anthony Valadez

Brooklyn electro-soul duo Denitia and Sene are among the artists KCRW DJ Anthony Valadez introduces us to in the latest installment of Here & Now DJ Sessions. (Mats Bakken)

KCRW’s Anthony Valadez joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson for the latest installment of DJ Sessions.

From Brooklyn electro-soul duo Denitia and Sene to Toronto jazz trio BadBadNotGood, he brings us “vibey” and melodic sounds that might make you want to roll down your car window and drive.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Walmart Partners With Wild Oats To Sell Cheaper Organics

Wild Oats, a popular organic food brand in the 1980s, will soon be on the shelves in the grocery section of your local Walmart. Wild Oats products are projected to sell for 25 percent less than other national organic brands, and will likely bring about a huge shift in organics supply chain. (Bill Lile/Flickr)

Look out, Whole Foods. This month, Walmart will start offering a new line of organics about 25 percent cheaper than the national organic brands it already carries, and those sold by its competitors.

The giant retailer is partnering with Wild Oats to bring in a new line of organic products. Wild Oats was a popular health brand in the 1980s and was acquired by Whole Foods in 2007.

But the Federal Trade Commission challenged the purchase, saying it was concerned about loss of competition. Ultimately, Whole foods sold its holdings in Wild Oats in 2009.

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Business & Technology
6:37 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Detroit Entrepreneur Stars In Ford Ad

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:11 pm

[Youtube]

Many people have seen the Cadillac ad for its new ELR vehicle. It’s the one where actor Neal McDonough walks briskly through his modern multi-million dollar home, disparaging Europeans who take vacations and singing the praises of capitalism

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NPR Story
3:05 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

20 Injured In Stabbing At Pennsylvania High School

Nineteen students and a security guard were stabbed as the school day began today at Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville, Penn., outside of Pittsburgh. They are expected to survive.

Authorities say a student wielding two knives went on a rampage down one hallway in the school and was tackled by the school principal. The student is now in custody and being questioned.

Deanna Garcia of public radio station WESA in Pittsburgh joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with the latest.

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NPR Story
3:05 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Ukulele Sensation Jake Shimabukuro

Ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro performs in the Here & Now studios. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 7:31 am

Jake Shimabukuro started playing ukulele at the age of 4 and soon fell in love with the instrument. As he tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson, ”My parents would have to take the ukulele away from me so that I would do things like my homework, eat dinner, or take a shower, you know I just loved it so much, every moment that I had free I wanted to strum the ukulele.”

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NPR Story
3:05 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

'Heartbleed' Security Flaw Exposes Millions Of Passwords

Experts have discovered a major flaw in the security software used by millions of websites. “Heartbleed,” as the vulnerability has been dubbed, is a bug that affects OpenSSL, a software that operates about two-thirds of all web servers.

OpenSSL is behind many sites that collect personal or financial information such as passwords, credit card info and emails. Although researchers discovered the coding error last week, the problem has been present for more than two years.

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NPR Story
3:46 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Water Crisis Not Over After West Virginia Chemical Spill

It’s been called one of the most serious episodes of drinking water contamination in U.S. history. Four months after thousands of gallons of the coal-washing chemical MCHM spilled from an unregulated above-ground storage tank into the Elk River, many people in and around Charleston, West Virginia, are still using bottled water.

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NPR Story
3:46 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Debate Over 'Love Locks' On Paris Bridges

No one knows where this practice started, but hundreds of thousands of locks adorn bridges in Paris. (Carlo Occiena/Flickr)

“Love locks” can be found on bridges from Australia to Italy, and even in U.S. cities like Norfolk, Virginia. The padlocks are latched onto pedestrian bridges and inscribed with vows of love. The keys are tossed into the water below as an testament of unbreakable devotion.

No one knows where the practice started, but hundreds of thousands of these locks adorn bridges in Paris. Some say it was from the 2006 novel, “Ho Voglia Di Te” (I Want You), by Italian author Federico Moccia, while other believe it was at the Seoul Tower in Korea.

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NPR Story
3:46 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Bringing The Colorado River Back To Long-Dry Parts Of Mexico

An eight-week release of water from the Morelos Dam has filled parts of the Colorado River Delta that haven't seen water in nearly two decades, like this spot about 20 miles south of the dam. (Stina Sieg/KJZZ)

For the first time in almost 20 years, the Colorado River is flowing into northern Mexico through a dam that usually stops it. It’s called a pulse flow — a temporary release of water.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Stina Sieg of KJZZ traveled to see the effect it’s having on Mexico’s long-barren delta.

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