Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

The gun violence prevention nonprofit Sandy Hook Promise has dropped NBC’s Megyn Kelly as host of its annual gala, over Kelly’s plans to air an interview with conspiracy theorist and Infowars host Alex Jones on her show on Sunday.

Macron's Party Poised For Big Win In France

Jun 12, 2017

The Republic on the Move party is a little more than a year old, but its leader Emmanuel Macron is now the French president, and the party did well in Sunday’s first round of parliamentary elections. It could have a huge majority in the French Parliament after this Sunday’s runoff.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with Florence Villeminot (@flovilleminot) of France 24.

Uber’s board is reportedly weighing a leave of absence for CEO and co-founder Travis Kalanick as part of a broader shake-up to try to improve company culture. The board voted unanimously over the weekend to adopt a range of recommendations from former Attorney General Eric Holder.

Comedy is booming in the United States, and Rolling Stone is showcasing some of the funniest in the business today with a new list: “The 50 Funniest People Right Now.”

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Rob Sheffield (@robsheff), author of the article, about what makes these comedians so great.

When a natural disaster like a hurricane or tornado hits, there’s often a lot of cleanup that comes afterward. In cemeteries and historic places, the damage can extend underground if uprooted trees tear up buried artifacts or even human remains.

Emily Jones (@ejreports) of Here & Now contributor Georgia Public Broadcasting went along with a crew in Savannah that’s looking for unearthed history from last fall’s Hurricane Matthew.

In recent days, there have been revelations about ethics waivers that allow federal employees to avoid ethics rules. And there have also been ethics questions raised about President Trump’s son Eric Trump.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets an update on the Trump administration and ethics from NPR’s Marilyn Geewax (@geewaxnpr).

Sarah Mack pilots her 24-foot boat to the edge of a grassy salt marsh in southern Louisiana to bring a slow-moving, $90 billion crisis to life.

Tierra Resources, a wetland restoration company, planted plastic poles at the edge of the marsh more than a year ago. Today, those poles stand alone in the water — at least 6 feet from the shore.

“And this is a more protected site,” says Mack, who started Tierra Resources after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans. “This is not bad erosion.”

There’s a lot of talk on Wall Street about the possibility of major moves in the market Thursday because of three events: former FBI director James Comey’s testimony in Congress, elections in the U.K. and a big meeting of the European Central Bank.

The British election is Thursday, and while Prime Minister Theresa May is still ahead in the polls, support for Labour Party candidate Jeremy Corbyn has grown more than expected.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with Mike Katz (@mikekatz), the Labour Party parliamentary candidate for the London suburb of Hendon.

Since the middle of the last century more than 90 percent of Isle de Jean Charles has dissolved into the southern Louisiana bayou.

The island, which is connected to the outside world by a road that’s known to flood in perfect weather, is home to a tribe of Native Americans who have fished and hunted there since the 1800s.

Those who remain are barely clinging to what’s left.

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